On Location: Inside The Penn State All-Sports Museum

Located inside Beaver Stadium is the Penn State All-Sports Museum.  Shortly after it opened in 2002, I remember taking a tour through it.  That was long before Sports Card Info existed, and I’ve always wanted to go back.  That’s exactly what I did over the weekend.

This museum is a mecca for Penn State fans.  Between the two floors it covers major moments from every sport they’re involved in.  Penn State memorabilia galore.  Given that the school was founded in 1855, it has a lot of history.  Football probably gets the most coverage, but all sports get their good share of recognition.  You don’t need to be a Penn State fan to appreciate all of the historical artifacts on display here.  Just being a sports fan is enough.

Once you’re finished visiting the museum, a guide will take you into the stadium.  Getting to see the field without anyone else around is really cool.  Usually the place is packed with 100,000 fans.

Before leaving, I stopped by the gift shop and found a new pin for my collection.  I was looking for a bobblehead, but didn’t find any.  The closest I got to a bobblehead was a Penn State-themed nutcracker.

I didn’t realize that John Montgomery Ward attended Penn State.  He assisted in helping them start their baseball program, and played one season for them in 1875.  Then he got kicked out for stealing some chickens.  Ward eventually went on to have a very successful professional baseball career.  The Baseball Hall of Fame inducted him in 1964.  You can find cards of him in the 19th century Allen & Ginter and Old Judge sets.

If you’re passing through State College, PA I highly suggest stopping.  They don’t charge for admission, but donations are appreciated.

 photo IMG_3348_zpsldsyd8z9.jpg

 photo IMG_3341_zpsuuaoeiib.jpg

The 1886 College Nine.  Standing: Halter, Jackson, Rose, Mock, Quigley, Mitchell.  Seated: McLean, Gibson, McClaren, Lencz.  Robert Gibson actually made it to the pros.

 photo IMG_3330_zps9yinfilc.jpg

Vintage Penn State baseball memorabilia.  Two game baseballs from 1905 and one from 1906.

 photo IMG_3326_zpswruxs3jz.jpg

 photo IMG_3328_zps9ullgggv.jpg

John Cappelletti’s Heisman trophy

 photo IMG_3327_zpsbyrwn9nf.jpg

 photo IMG_3324_zpsqgefo0ue.jpg

1986 National Championship trophy

 photo IMG_3329_zpsj0st8esg.jpg

1969 Orange Bowl trophy

 photo IMG_3339_zps7q7r9lg8.jpg

Early 1900s basketball jersey.  Game ball from 1921.

 photo IMG_3334_zpssbzcqkpb.jpg

The Gene Wettstone Most Valuable Gymnast Award

 photo IMG_3332_zpsxeuubevj.jpg

The Nittany Lion mascot is based on the eastern mountain lion which went extinct during the late 1800s.  This one was shot in 1856.  Considering the techniques for stuffing an animal back then are nothing like they are today, its in great condition.  Its probably one of the finest examples of a taxidermied eastern mountain lion.

 photo IMG_3336_zps93iif8jp.jpg

Sears sponsored fencing trophies.  When was the last time Sears could sponsor anything?

 photo IMG_3338_zpsmytdgjyv.jpg

 photo IMG_3347_zpsfrhn3jt5.jpg

 photo IMG_3345_zps6ynl7im5.jpg

 photo IMG_3346_zpsygx3fpej.jpg

 photo IMG_3342_zpsiwve4koq.jpg

Advertisements

One Response

  1. It’s a shame that the history of Penn State was tarnished by the actions of one sick individual, the legacy of this university in the American sports landscape is undeniable. Great post!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: