2019 Onyx Authenticated Vintage Collection Baseball Variation Guide

For those collectors ripping into boxes of 2019 Onyx Authenticated Vintage Collection, here is a handy guide to the variations that you can pull.

Only (4) players from the 22-card checklist have photo variations – Brent Honeywell, Taylor Trammell, Nolan Gorman, and Heliot Ramos.  Unsigned versions of these photo variations are limited to (30) copies each.  Autographed cards featuring these images are limited to Blue Ink #’ed/25, Green Ink #’ed/10, Red Ink #’ed/5, and Black Ink #’ed/1.

Its very important that you consult this guide before listing any of your cards for sale or buying any of them on the secondary market.  I’ve seen people attempting to pass off a base photo autograph signed in Blue Ink #’ed/200 for a photo variation #’ed/25.  You need to know what you’re buying and selling, especially since the serial numbers aren’t printed on the cards.  The value of a card with a base photo versus a variation can be dramatically different.

Non-autograph #’ed/30.  Autographed – Blue Ink #’ed/25, Green Ink #’ed/10, Red Ink #’ed/5, and Black Ink #’ed/1.

Non-autograph #’ed/30.  Autographed – Blue Ink #’ed/25, Green Ink #’ed/10, Red Ink #’ed/5, and Black Ink #’ed/1.

Non-autograph #’ed/30.  Autographed – Blue Ink #’ed/25, Green Ink #’ed/10, Red Ink #’ed/5, and Black Ink #’ed/1.

Non-autograph #’ed/30.  Autographed – Blue Ink #’ed/25, Green Ink #’ed/10, Red Ink #’ed/5, and Black Ink #’ed/1.

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These Are NOT Mike Schmidt Rookie Cards

Michael Jack Schmidt will go down in history as one of the greatest third baseman to ever play the game.  He is definitely the best third baseman to ever wear a Phillies uniform.  I enjoy listening to him talk with the rest of the Phillies broadcast team on weekend home games.

If you’re in the market for a Mike Schmidt rookie card, look no further than 1973 Topps BaseballIts card #615 in the set, and he’s pictured along side John Hilton and Ron Cey.  This card, and it’s Canadian printed O-Pee-Chee counterpart, are his only recognized rookies.

One of these days I plan to own a Schmidt rookie.  They’re readily available.  I just haven’t pulled the trigger yet.  I’d like to own a PSA 5, 6, or 7 example.  Cards graded higher start to get expensive.

Pictured below is a small group of Mike Schmidt rookie-era cards that are not officially recognized as true rookies.  That doesn’t mean they’re worthless.  In fact, most are very desirable.  But authentic rookies they are NOT.

My favorite one is the 1973 Topps Philadelphia Phillies Team Card #536.  Since his real rookie card has more than one person on it, I guess some people like to think the team card counts too.

1972 Puerto Rican League Sticker #64

1973 Philadelphia Phillies Team Issue Postcard – Early Season

1973 Philadelphia Phillies Team Issue Postcard – Late Season

1973 Topps Philadelphia Phillies Team Card #536

These Are NOT Tom Seaver Rookie Cards

Earlier this month it was announced by Tom Seaver’s family that he would be retiring from public life due to dementia.  That’s a shame.  For years he’s been a regular on the autograph circuit.  This 12x All-Star pitcher and 1992 Baseball Hall of Fame inductee will be greatly missed.  Thanks Tom Terrific!

Whenever I hear Tom Seaver’s name, I always think back to the first National Sports Collectors Convention that I attended in 2007.  While I was there, I pulled a Tom Seaver/Dwight Gooden/Roger Clemens Triple Auto Relic #’ed 1/1 from a pack of ’07 Triple Threads.

Tom Seaver has a ton of cards.  Autographs and relics of him are all over the place.  His one true rookie card comes from the 1967 Topps Baseball set.  Its card #581, and he is pictured along side fellow Mets pitcher Bill Denehy.  Along with Mickey Mantle and the Rod Carew rookie, its one of the most sought after cards in the set.

There are five Tom Seaver cards from that era which could easily be mistaken for his actual rookie.

1967 B&E Color Advertising New York Mets Postcard – Team Issue

1968 Topps All-Star Rookie #45 – Whenever that All-Star Rookie trophy shows up I sometimes think people believe its an actual rookie card.  In most cases, the player was a rookie the year before.

1968 O-Pee-Chee All-Star Rookie #45 – The same info from the 68 Topps applies, except this card was printed in Canada.

1968 Topps All-Star Rookie Milton Bradley #45 – The same info from the ’68 Topps applies, except the back of this card has a brighter color yellow.  Its part of a Milton Bradley board game called “Win A Card”.

1968 Topps All-Star Rookie Venezuelan #45 – The same info from the ’68 Topps applies.  This set was released in South America.  The cards were printed on gray stock, and have an orange tint.  Most of the cards say “Hecho en Venezulela – C. A. Litoven” on the back.  Tom Seaver’s card does not.

Marquis of Lorne – 140th Anniversary of The Original Trading Card

Every single day all over the world packs and boxes of trading cards are opened.  Its a hobby enjoyed by many.  To some it can be an addiction.  The idea of what could be in that next pack or box can be too tempting to ignore.  If it weren’t for the tobacco industry and their pack inserted cards, there is a good chance this hobby of ours wouldn’t exist.

What is the first pack-inserted tobacco card?

The gentleman who has the honor of being on the first pack-inserted tobacco card is John George Edward Henry Douglas Sutherland Campbell.  Good luck fitting that name on a jersey.  This dude was into a little bit of everything.  He was well traveled, well educated, and even married Princess Louise, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria.  Titles he held included being the 9th Duke of Argyll, and Marquis of Lorne.

Between 1878-1883 the Marquis of Lorne was serving as the 4th Governor General of Canada.  Quite impressive considering he was a British nobleman.  The Thos. H. Hall cigarette manufacturer of New York at this time decided to include a tobacco card of him in their Marquis of Lorne brand of cigarettes in 1879.  Unfortunately this brand didn’t sell well, and it quickly flamed out.  Very few cards survived.  It measures 3.125″ x 1.625″, the exact size of the cigarette packet.  The American Card Catalog officially classifies it as N519.

As of this writing, only four examples are known to exist.  One is in New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Another is in the British Museum in London.  The other two are in private collections.

Only one of the four known examples has popped up for sale.  The same card has been sold twice.  In 1994 it sold for $11,500, and then again in 2009 for $15,275.  I believe it would be worth even more if it were of a sports figure.

I can’t stress how important this tiny piece of cardboard is to the hobby.  Prior to the 1879 N519 Marquis of Lorne card, advertisements such as this were handed out over the counter.  Not inside cigarette packs.  Despite the Marquis of Lorne cigarette brand not making it, the idea of cardboard inserts did.

You probably wouldn’t be opening that box or pack if this card wouldn’t have been printed.  Everything pretty much snowballed from this single card.  Starting in 1880, many more tobacco inserts followed.

Futera To Launch Limited Edition Memorabilia Card Presentation Sets

Futera is one of those card companies I wish collectors in the United States would pay more attention to.  This company makes some awesome looking cards.  Here in the U.S., we have new card products coming out all the time.  Futera is the total opposite.  They produce a handful of high-quality card sets each year.

The collector services that Futera offers is incredible.  Every time I talk about this company, I have to mention their Code for Collectors and Memorabilia Colour Grading services.  Code for Collectors enables you to see the detailed process of how your favorite memorabilia card came to be.  Memorabilia Colour Grading is a service in which you can use to tell how many 1-color, 2-color, 3-color, etc… relic cards were made of a specific card.  This is very helpful when it comes to cracking down on fake patches.  U.S. collectors would love to have services such as these.

Futera is preparing to launch it’s latest round of products.  This time its all about a series of Limited Edition Memorabilia Card Presentation Sets.

  • There is a total of (10) quality football (soccer) memorabilia cards in each set, comprising a complete 9-player memorabilia card set plus an ultra-rare centerpiece memorabilia card of one of the featured players.
  • The release features game-used and training-used memorabilia – information about the player’s memorabilia is written on the back of the card.
  • Every card features a 24ct gold-plated element framing the player’s memorabilia.
  • Each card is individually foil numbered and has a unique security code.
  • Enter card codes on the FUTERA APP to digitally sort and store the cards in an online Card Album and get information about the rarity and features of each card and Portfolio/card values based on actual card sales (powered by PriceGuide.cards).  These are free information services active shortly after the launch.

Manchester City FC (10 sets), Liverpool FC (29 sets for each title), and World Football (27 sets for each title) cover this new product.  Each set cost $499.  According to Futera, the Liverpool FC sets are completely sold out already.  Sets should start shipping near the end of the month.

Click on each picture for that set’s sales sheet.

Manchester City FCLiverpool FCWorld Football

2004-05 NBA Hoops Mysterious Unreleased Master Collection Parallel

If you recall, I was recently contacted by an individual who has in their possession some uncut, unfinished, and unreleased Fleer cards.  I blogged about it here.  Upon posting that write-up, I was hoping to get some feedback from collectors that could shed some more light on these cards.  Thanks to Cardboard History, we’ve had a breakthrough.

One of the items this person has in his collection is a 4-card uncut sheet from 2004-05 Fleer SkyBox NBA Hoops.  The players include Antawn Jamison, Allan Houston, Ray Allen, and Clifford Robinson.  Other than being uncut, all seems normal except for a mysterious gold dot found on each card.

The 2004-05 Fleer SkyBox NBA Hoops set consists of (200) cards.  Each card in the base set has one parallel – Hoops 100 #’ed/100.  If the base set looks familiar, that’s because its a throwback tribute to 1994-95 NBA Hoops.

Before settling on the Hoops 100 parallel, I believe Fleer had another parallel in mind and then decided to can it.  Getting a closer look at the gold dot it says “MASTER COLLECTION” around the outside.  Inside it states “Trading Cards, FLEER, Frank H. Fleer Established 1906”.

This unreleased MASTER COLLECTION parallel probably would’ve been another tribute to the 1994-95 NBA Hoops set.  A 50-card insert set called Supreme Court was made for 1994-95 NBA HoopsThese cards look just like the base, except they have a gold stamp that says “Supreme Court NBA Hoops” on them.

Another big difference is that the NBA Hoops logo on the MASTER COLLECTION parallels are printed in blue foil versus the standard silver.  Now, these cards were at the finishers at the time they were acquired.  Whether or not that logo was going to stay blue is something we’ll never know.

As always, your thoughts are gladly welcomed.

These Are NOT Mickey Mantle Rookie Cards

A big pet peeve of mine is when people refer to certain authentic cards as an athlete’s rookie card when in fact they’re NOT.  This happens all the time.  Some athletes are more prone to it than others.

One of the biggest, if not the biggest, athlete this applies to is Yankees slugger Mickey Mantle.  I know this may sound like common knowledge for most of us, but Mickey Mantle only has one rookie card.  Its card #253 in the 1951 Bowman Baseball set.  That’s it.  His one and only true rookie card.  No debate needed.

Countless reprints have been made over the decades.  But that isn’t what bothers me.  Three items from that era are constantly being called rookies, but truly aren’t.

Mickey Mantle’s 1952 Berk Ross card uses the same photograph found on his ’51 Bowman rookie.  Although there are some differences between the two, one could easily be mistaken for another.  The 1952 Berk Ross set consists of (72) cards.  I’ve never been a big fan of this set because the images are fuzzy and of poor quality.

Can you believe thousands of these 1952 Topps High Numbers cards were just tossed away in the ocean?  It happened.  They were part of a stash of old inventory that nobody wanted, and Topps dumped them.  You regularly see this classic called Mickey Mantle’s rookie.  Its his first Topps card, but a rookie it is not.

Technically not a card, this Mickey Mantle photograph is part of a Wheaties promotional set from 1951.  The promotion was not widely done, and did not receive the best feedback.  Still not a rookie card though.