“Pin-Up” of the Week: 1911 World’s Series Shibe Park Philadelphia Press Pin

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Here it is folks.  The mother of all press pins.  Only a handful of these puppies are known to still be floating around.  I’ve used World Series press pins for this post before, but nothing as big as this one.  Why is this pin such a big deal?  Because 1911 was the first year they issued press pins to members of the media.

Baseball fans watched the Philadelphia A’s take on the New York Giants in 1911.  The Giants manager, John McGraw, would constantly invite his friends to big games.  It wasn’t uncommon for them to crowd-up the press box.  Between a local reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer named Stephen O. Grauley, and A’s manager Connie Mack, the press pin was born.  Only those people wearing this pin gained access to the press area.  And the rest is all history.  Press pins have been part of the World Series ever since.

The pin pictured above is from Grauley’s personal collection.  In February, Heritage Auctions plans to put it up for sale along with some other press pins Grauley collected over the years.  This pin alone is expected to fetch $40,000.  For it’s age, I can’t believe how great the condition is.  That fabric portion of the pin is a prime target for damage.

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Card of the Day: Wilbur Goode 1911 Sweet Caporal T205

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Card of the Day: Georges Vezina 1911 C55 Imperial #38

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Rare Gem On Display At Citizens Bank Park

Last night while watching the Phillies I heard Tom McCarthy and Chris Wheeler talk about something you rarely hear about on prime time television – baseball cards.  Right now at Citizens Bank Park this 1909-11 T206 uncut strip containing Honus Wagner will be on display thanks to Hunt Auctions.  This strip has been bought and sold many times over the years and still amazes collectors.  How in the hell did this thing stay together after all this time?  Many rumors state it was found in a pair of old pants owned by Wagner.

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This would make the ultimate box topper.

Flashback Product of the Week: 1911 C59 Imperial Tobacco Lacrosse

Last week Upper Deck announced that they plan to make a lacrosse set.  I’m probably going to stay far away from this product since I’m really not into lacrosse.  I think its a preppy version of hockey 🙂  Its always interesting to see what a company like Upper Deck will do to survive.

Oddly though, this won’t be the first time lacrosse players have found their way onto cardboard.  Imperial Tobacco Company created a few sets between 1910 and 1912.  They are classified as C59, C60, and C61.  Somehow the 1911 cards are classified as C59 and not C60.  This is where it can be a bit confusing, especially when two of the years basically are the same except for a few cards.  They aren’t the most valuable tobacco cards on the market, but if one surfaces that is in excellent condition the sky is the limit.

A few weeks ago while visiting Baltimore, I went into the Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards.  Inside they had a pair of lacrosse sticks from 1780.  I should haven taken a picture of them.

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I think its odd that they have the card number on the front.

This Is Why Tobacco Cards Are So Valuable

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Reason #9,671 why tobacco cards are so valuable – condition.  Wouldn’t you like to know the story of how these cards got like this?  That Pittsburgh card isn’t of Wagner.  Instead its of Willis.  Someone is trying to get $150.00 for all of these, but I doubt thats going to happen.  I’m sure one of the auction houses thats been investigated by the FBI could “fix” them up to look brand new.  Then again, even these cards might a stretch for them.

Card of the Day: 1909-11 T206 Honus Wagner PSA 8

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