Card of the Day: Walter Hagen 1933 Sport Kings #8

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How To Spot A Fake Babe Ruth 1933 Goudey #144 Baseball Card

Babe Ruth has a lot of iconic vintage cards.  One of these cards would be his 1933 Goudey #144.  Many consider it to be his true rookie card.  It features a full body color shot of the Sultan of Swat swinging a bat.  Its a great little piece of artwork.  Over time there have been tons of fakes and reprints made and some of them are pretty good.

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Pictured above is a good example of an original Ruth 1933 Goudey #144.  When looking at the back, you can obviously see the card was miscut.  The card numbers for this set are suppose to be at the top, not the bottom.  Since this card was miscut, you don’t see Ruth’s proper card number 144 at the top.  Instead you see number 154 at the bottom.  Card number 154 belongs to Jimmy Foxx and if a number had to appear at the bottom of this miscut card, that would be the one to look for.  Not every authentic original was miscut, but it is something to look for.  You can also see some bleeding on the back, right above the word “New” in the first line of Ruth’s bio.  The word “George” is coming through from the front.  Most reprints don’t have this.

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Here is a typical example of a Babe Ruth 1933 Goudey #144 reprint.  Not only is the condition a lot better, but look at Ruth’s hat.  When you compare the reprint to the original, you’ll notice that on the original there is some yellow space between his hat and the white border of the card.  On the reprint there is no space.  The reprint shows his hat meeting the border.

These tips can be used for most cards that come from the 1933 Goudey set.  If you’ve never taken the time to read the back of this card, I suggest you should. It actually makes you feel like its 1933.

Card of the Day: Charley Root 1933 Goudey #226

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Card of the Day: Lefty Grove 1933 DeLong #23

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Card of the Day: 1933 Indian Chewing Gum Omaha Tribe #16

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Speaking of things Omaha, throughout the month of August, Omaha Steaks is running a “Hole in One” promotion, challenging all golf enthusiasts to hit a hole in one to win a FREE package of 4 Omaha Steaks Filet Mignons.  Anyone located in the US that achieves an ace on a hole of at least 150-yards may submit their hole in one certificate to Omaha Steaks via Facebook, email, or by mail to receive four (6 oz.) Omaha Steaks filet mignons.  In support of this exciting initiative, we will be giving away weekly prizes on Facebook and Twitter for our Hole in One Trivia Contest, which will run every Friday throughout the month of August.  In addition, if you check in on foursquare at a local golf course, tweet your check-in to @OmahaSteaks, and mention that you are golfing for Omaha Steaks, you will be entered into a weekly drawing for a chance to win other delicious Omaha Steaks prizes.

Be sure to check out Omaha Steaks on Facebook and Twitter.  Don’t forget to tweet @OmahaSteaks to let them know your golfing for Omaha Steaks!!!

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Card of the Day: Bobby Jones 1933 Sport Kings Gum #38

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Card of the Day: Rabbit Maranville 1933 Goudey #117

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HAPPY EASTER!!!!

Card of the Day: Chuck Klein 1933 Goudey #128

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Wrapper Rippers: Goudey vs. Sport Kings

Lets say your cleaning out your grandfather’s attic and you come across an old shoebox.  After lifting the lid you find two old sealed wax packs, one being a pack of 1933 Goudey and the other 1933 Sport Kings.  Showing your grandfather what you found he tells you to choose one and open it.

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1933 Goudey baseball is one of the most popular vintage sets to collect.  The set consists of 240 cards (counting the Lajoie) and was Goudey’s first attempt at making a baseball product.  Many collectors believe that Babe Ruth’s cards from this product are some of his best.  

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1933 Sport Kings, which was produced by the Goudey Gum Company, contains 48 cards within the set.  You could consider this to be the “King” of multi-sport products.  The set is made up of some of the best athletes of the time from a vast amount of sports.  Some of the key cards to pull would be Ruth, Cobb, Thorpe, Grange, and Bobby Jones.  At the time of its release, there were 100 packs to each box.

Which would you open & why?

The Original Card Backs

The back of a card is one of the most informative places to learn more about an athlete.  When athletes first started appearing on those small pieces of cardboard in the late 1800’s, the reverse side would yield nothing more than a blank space.  As card collecting became more and more popular, manufacturers thought it would be a good idea not only to place an advertisment on the back, but also statistics on the player and a description about their history.  One of the best sets to not only describe the athlete, but to bring the sport alive in the collector’s eye would have to be 1933 Sport Kings Gum.  This 48 card set features some of the best athletes of the time.  Not only are the front of the cards great to look at, but the backs contain some of the best descriptions of the sport.  Lets take billiards great Willie Hoppe #36 for example.  Here is what the card’s back reads:

Shakespeare tells us that Cleopatra played billiards during the days of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, but probably one of the best known billiardists of all time is Willie Hoppe, who is still actively interested in the game.  He travels about the country demonstrating his marvelous ability in the interests of the game’s advancement.  Billiards are divided into several games, the most prominent being pocket billiards, 18.1 and 18.2 balk-line and three cushion billiards.  Hoppe excelled in all of these, winning the 18.1 balk-line championship in 1907, 1908, and 1910, and 18.2 championship from 1910-1920 and again 1922-1924.  He had a high run of 20 in three- cushion billiards in 1928 in American League Tournament and made a high run of 25 in an exhibition in California in 1925.

 As you can see, not only do they clearly describe the athlete, but they also touch on the history of the sport.  This isn’t something that you would normally read on the back of a modern day sports card, and is something that I’d like to see done more.  Many cards today might give you a few sentences about the player and a couple of statistics, but there aren’t too many manufacturers today that take the time to write like this.  What really surprises me is that the higher-end products contain less and less detail on the backs versus lower-end products.  I guess that will happen in an industry that loves to get “hits” and would rather read the company’s COA.

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