Card of the Day: Carnell Lake 1989 Pro Set #548

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Card of the Day: Randy Johnson 1989 Score #645

Product Highlight: Darryl Strawberry 1989 Saranac Glove

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Saranac.  Wasn’t that the name of a character that Johnny Carson use to play?  Oh wait!  That was Carnac the Magnificent.

Cards containing pieces of glove are seen throughout the hobby today.  Its ironic because at one time it was the other way around.  Collectors would buy gloves to get cards versus buying cards with gloves in them.  Relic cards really turned this industry upside down.

Saranac Gloves is a glove manufacturer which is still around today.  They make gloves for all types of uses including sports.  In the late 1980’s, Saranac struck up a deal with New York Mets superstar Darryl Strawberry to support their line of batting gloves.  Marketing thought it would be a good idea to package a baseball card with the gloves they wanted Strawberry to wear.  Instead of using a standard photograph, Saranac hired artist Dan Gardiner to paint a picture.  Upon seeing the final piece of work, Darryl Strawberry wasn’t satisfied with the way he thought his nose looked.  Apparently they didn’t check with him as the painting was being worked on.  By the time they found out he wasn’t happy, Saranac already had the cards printed and ready to go.  I guess it was too late to make any changes, and the whole thing was scrapped.  All printed cards at the time were ordered to be thrown out.

Whenever an unreleased card is suppose to be trashed, someone almost always doesn’t follow through.  Its hardwired into a collectors brain to automatically notice that this would create a rare card.  A few found their way out.

Pricing can be all over the place.  Most aren’t in the best condition, which leads me to believe these could’ve been dug out of the trash.  Rumor has it that at one time this card sold for up to $500.  I’ve only seen one, and it was fairly beat up.

I wonder what happened to the original painting?  Do you think Darryl Strawberry would sign one of these cards if he were attending a show?

Card of the Day: Gregg Olson 1989 Topps #161

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Card of the Day: Greg Jelks 1989 ProCards Louisville Redbirds #1258

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Card of the Day: Joey Belle 1989 Score Traded #106T

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Flashback Product of the Week: 1989 CBS Television Announcers

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CBS loves to keep reminding you of what you already know you’re watching.  If you took a shot every time they said “This is the NFL on CBS.” you’d probably pass out before they held the coin toss.  I remember Saturday Night Live making note of this back in the 90’s.  Kevin Nealon played Jim Nantz, and he kept repeating “This is the NFL on CBS.” over and over again.  “CBS proudly presents The Masters.” is another one you hear a lot.

Television stations are the last places you think about when it comes to card manufacturers.  For a very brief moment in 1989, CBS made football cards.  Now, this was not some nationally distributed product that came in a fancy box.  It was more like a ten-card set shipped in a few envelopes.

For those members of the 1989 CBS Football Announcing Team who either at one time played in the NFL or coached, received a card.  The players include: Terry Bradshaw, Dick Butkus, Irv Cross, Dan Fouts, Pat Summerall, Gary Fencik, Dan Jiggetts, John Madden, Ken Stabler, and Hank Stram.  As you can see, the cards feature an action shot of the person during their time in the NFL.  The photos were then placed on a green football field with a white yard mark.  On the back you’ll find a horizontal layout containing a head shot, biography, and stats all bordered in red.

CBS split this set up into two different releases.  Each issue has five cards.  They were sent out to various CBS representatives probably as a marketing tool.  Although they aren’t serial numbered, only about (500) sets are suppose to exist.  The price for an individual card and/or complete set can be all over the place.  It definitely is one of those oddball sets from the late 80’s.