Card of the Day: Craig Wolanin 1992-93 Topps #487

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Card of the Day: Stacey Augmon 1992-93 Upper Deck 6 Million Point Man #68

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Flashback Product of the Week: 1992-93 Case XX Racing Series Knives

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No.  You’re not imagining anything.  This was a real product sold in stores.  What is it with racing fans and knives?  They seem to go hand in hand with each other.

A few different companies came together in order for this product to reach the shelves – Little River Knives, Case XX Racing Collectibles, and Maxx Racing.  From what I can find, at least three different sets were released between 1992 and 1993.  As you can clearly see, inside each package is a fully functioning folding pocket knife and an exclusive Maxx Racing card.  The cards come with red, blue, and black borders.  They also contain the Case XX Racing Collectibles logo in the corner.

I think we can all agree the most interesting thing here is the knife.  You just don’t see knives packaged with cards.  Its down right odd.  Each knife matches-up with the driver pictured on the card.  You’ll even find a facsimile signature engraved on the blade.  I can’t help but think of that Saturday Night Live skit with Dan Aykroyd selling dangerous toys to children.

Anytime something is labeled “Collectors Edition” in this hobby the odds of it being worth anything is low.  All of these knives were massively overproduced and can easily be found today.  Most can be bought for $10 to $20.  What they do have slightly going for them is the conversation piece factor.

Its ironic that you probably need a knife to get into the package.  No mystery here folks.  This product gets straight to the “point”.

Flashback Product of the Week: Revolutionary Comics 1992-93 Baseball Legends

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Revolutionary Comics had a short lifespan.  It was founded in 1989 and went belly up five years later.  They were known for printing unauthorized biographies of famous people, specifically musicians.  Their line of Rock ‘N’ Roll Comics was very successful.  Some musicians were totally for it, while others took up legal action against them.  It seemed the more legal cases thrown at them, the more comics they sold.  But in the end, it was their line of sports titles that lead to their downfall.

During it’s reign, Revolutionary Comics issued four different sports titles.  It began with Baseball Superstars Comics in 1991.  They then went on to print Baseball Legends ComicsSports Legends Comics, and Sports Superstars Comics.  Much like their Rock ‘N’ Roll Comics, these told the unauthorized biographies of popular sports figures from the past and present.  Sports fans didn’t find these as entertaining as they thought.  I don’t think they caught on because you know how the story was going to end.  Their sports titles racked up a lot of debt.  Losing a lawsuit to the Pittsburgh Penguins over the use of their logo, and having to settle another suit brought on by Joe Montana certainly didn’t help.

Some of their sports issues contained cards.  Not every one though.  In March of 1992 Revolutionary Comics started their Baseball Legends Comics.  This particular series ran until September of 1993.  In total there are (19) issues.  The issues about Billy Martin, Yogi Berra, Roberto Clemente, Honus Wagner, and Willie Mays all contained (3) cards each.  You would need to tear apart the cards as they came in an uncut strip.  The artwork mimics that of the comic book, which is something I wouldn’t mind seeing tried on today’s cards.  I think they look really cool.  Every now and then some of these cards will surface.  Just like the comic books, the cards don’t hold much value.