Product Highlight: 1999 Jersey Topps

Have you seen these before?  They’ve been around for the last nineteen years, and this is the first time that I’ve spotted them.  Its funny the kind of stuff you’ll come across when you’re researching for a blog post.  Whenever I see a mainstream manufacturer issue a product that isn’t card related at all I have to stop and look.  Especially when its something as obscure as this.

What we have here folks is Jersey Topps produced by the Topps Company in 1999.  There isn’t a lot of information floating around about them.  Mainly because they didn’t make it past the inaugural edition, and plus there really isn’t much to discuss in the first place.

Packaged inside each box is (1) mini replica jersey.  According to the back of the box:

We took the game’s best and cut them down to size to bring you these new collectibles.  Jersey Topps are free-standing, miniature replicas of the authentic jerseys of six of the greatest players in Major League Baseball.  They’re finely crafted from flexible vinyl to capture the real, lifelike details of your favorite player’s uniform the way no photo can!

The checklist consists of:

  • Mark McGwire
  • Derek Jeter
  • Sammy Sosa
  • Cal Ripken Jr.
  • Chipper Jones
  • Ken Griffey Jr.

Despite existing for almost two decades, I wouldn’t be surprised if you hadn’t heard of them either.  $10-$30 seems to be the going rate.  No player collection should be without one… or a hundred.

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How To Spot A Fake 1999 Upper Deck SP Signature Edition Dan Marino Autograph

Dan Marino is no stranger when it comes to counterfeit cards.  His 1984 Topps rookie has been heavily faked over the years.  So much in fact its not safe to purchase one raw.  You’re safer buying one that’s been graded and/or authenticated.  I’m not saying fakes don’t get by them, but it can drastically reduce the odds of owning one that isn’t real.

Rookies aren’t the only cards of his that get counterfeited.  Autographs from popular sets are also in danger.  Take for example this 1999 Upper Deck SP Signature Edition Autograph.  Cards from this set are highly sought after.  Especially big name players like Dan Marino.  Every 12-pack box featured an on-card autograph inside each pack.  Still a relatively new concept at the time.  This is also one of the earliest brands to introduce cut signatures.  Sealed boxes command major dollars today.  The asking price for a single sealed box is usually around $1,000.

Adding a Dan Marino autograph from this set to your collection is a great choice.  But you need to be extremely careful.  Over the last few years counterfeits have flooded the market.  When compared to authentic versions, the counterfeits usually have these characteristics:

  • Slightly smaller in size
  • Blurred lettering and logos
  • Completely glossy – authentic cards have a matte background, and just the player is glossy
  • Incorrect coloring

Another big giveaway is the autograph.  Of the counterfeits I’ve seen, the autograph looks nothing like the real thing.  There are lots of discrepancies.  Dan Marino almost always includes the #13 in his signature.  These forgers didn’t even do that.  Plus the pen they used looks to be much thicker.

For a detailed side-by-side comparison, check out this post over on the Blowout Cards Forums.

Fake

Authentic

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