How To Spot A Fake Brett Favre 1991 Score #611 Rookie Card

When you think about Brett Favre rookie cards, his #611 card from the 1991 Score Football set certainly isn’t the first one that pops in your head.  Most collectors immediately think about his 1991 Topps Stadium Club #94 RC.  Although his Stadium Club card is his most notable rookie, Upper Deck, Classic, Pro Set, and Score each issued less-popular versions of their own.

Why in the world would someone want to counterfeit a Score card from the junk-wax era?  Perhaps that’s exactly what these counterfeiters were thinking when they were printing these fakes up.  I like to believe they were hoping to catch collectors off guard.

For under $5 this card can easily be added to your collection.  But please be careful.  In 2007, counterfeit examples began to arrive.

Its extremely easy to spot a counterfeit.  Keep these thoughts in mind:

  • No card number.  That’s right!  These genius counterfeiters completely forgot to place the “611” on the back.
  • Locate the NFLPA logo on the back.  On counterfeits this logo is very smudged.  Not crisp and clear like an authentic example.
  • The gold border on the back is not the correct color.  Counterfeit copies tend to have a brighter gold border.

Advertisements

How To Spot A Fake Mario Lemieux 1985-86 Topps #9 Rookie Card

Most of the value found in the 1985-86 Topps Hockey set comes down to just one card.  Of the (165) cards, #9 is the most sought after mainly because its Mario Lemieux’s rookie card.  Lemieux is a Penguins and NHL legend.  After retiring in 1997, he was immediately inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.  In 2000, he became the third Hall of Famer to come out of retirement and play after being inducted.  Gordie Howe and Guy Lafleur are the other two.

A Mario Lemieux rookie card from this set can sell anywhere from $40-$50 today.  You need to watch out for counterfeits.  Tons have flooded the market for years.

Here are a few tips on what to watch for when it comes to spotting counterfeit Mario Lemieux 1985-86 Topps rookie cards:

  • Take a look at the Penguins logo on the front of the card in the upper-right corner.  The logo should have solid black shading, and good color separation.  If the black shading and/or color borders are dotted and/or bleed together you’re probably looking at a counterfeit.
  • Inspect the edges of the card’s front.  A lot of counterfeit copies seem to have a red/maroon/burgundy color blending into the front edges.  These colors are seen on the back, but counterfeit examples used less sophisticated printing techniques and many times they soaked through to the front.

How To Spot A Fake Rickey Henderson 1980 Topps #482 Rookie Card

The 1980 Topps Baseball set comes in at a whopping (726) cards.  Its a fairly memorable set too considering in 1981 Fleer and Donruss joined the licensed baseball card party.  Out of those (726) cards, one rises above them all.  I’m talking about #482.  The Rickey Henderson rookie card.

Rickey Henderson is a hot dog, base stealing legend, who made it into the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  He made his major league debut with the Oakland Athletics in 1979, and wrapped-up his playing career in 2003 in a Dodgers uniform.  Its absolutely amazing how long his career lasted.

Rickey Henderson was a fast runner, and stole a ton of bases.  But his 1980 Topps #482 rookie card couldn’t outrun the counterfeiters.  As Rickey’s star began to rise, his rookie card increased in value.  That price increase attracted lots of counterfeits to enter the market.

A large number of counterfeit Rickey Henderson 1980 Topps #482 rookie cards have these qualities:

  • Rickey Henderson’s name on the front will feature many small dots in the print pattern.  On authentic examples, the name should be in solid black.  No dots.
  • Counterfeits have been known to have a green and white dot pattern in the background of the A’s logo on the front.  The background should be solid green.
  • The circle around the copyright logo © on the back tends to be broken and incomplete on counterfeit copies.
  • Bright vibrant colors on the yellow and green, perfect centering, and the card’s thickness can all be giveaways of a counterfeit.  If possible, try to compare it to another Oakland A’s card from the 1980 Topps set.

How To Spot A Fake Dan Marino 1984 Topps #123 Rookie Card

1984 Topps Football is loaded with lots of rookie cards.  Eric Dickerson, Howie Long, and Dwight Stephenson to name a few.  There are two quarterbacks though who’s rookie cards you immediately think about whenever this set is mentioned – John Elway and Dan Marino.  Both have been heavily counterfeited over the years.

With so many grading companies looking the other way and allowing trimmed/counterfeit cards to pass through, its important to know what to watch out for.  Nothing could be more irritating than finding out the centerpiece of your collection is a fake.

Below are some tips on what to keep an eye open for when looking at Dan Marino 1984 Topps rookie cards:

  • Black border – many counterfeit examples exhibit a black border that comes to four sharp corners around the photo.  On authentic examples, those corners are much more rounded.
  • If you’re able to weigh the card, counterfeits tend to be a little heavier.  Counterfeits tend to weigh 1.93 grams compared to the normal 1.90 grams.
  • Look at the Miami Dolphins logo on the card’s front.  The stripes on the dolphin’s helmet are usually fuzzier on a counterfeit.  Take a common Miami Dolphins card from that set and compare it to the Dan Marino card you’re looking at.  Authentic examples should have clear stripes.
  • On the front of Marino’s jersey you can see the number “13”.  Lots of counterfeits have a notch out of the “1” near the edge towards the center.
  • On the back of the card, the © logo is incomplete, and the “A” in “YEAR” and “8” in “1983” (in the statistics box) are both filled in on counterfeits.

Yes… Sonic the Hedgehog Does Have A Rookie Card

What was the first thing you had on your mind this morning?  If it was “Does Sonic the Hedgehog have a rookie card?”, then you’ve come to the right place.

Introduced to the world in 1991, Sonic the Hedgehog is an iconic video game character.  This fast-moving, chili-dog eating speedster has been on a never-ending quest to stop the evil Doctor Robotnik from taking over the world.  Many gamers, including myself, have fond memories of watching this dude speed through loops and tunnels.  The sound of Sonic collecting those gold rings has been permanently ingrained into gamer’s heads.

Sonic the Hedgehog 3 and Sonic & Knuckles were the two games I played the most on my SEGA Genesis.  Both games could be played separately.  Thanks to the “lock-on” technology, it was possible to connect Sonic the Hedgehog 3 into the top of the Sonic & Knuckles cartridge.  This allowed people to play the game as it was originally intended.  Cartridge space and time constraints resulted in SEGA splitting them up into two games.  Figuring out both games could be connected together like that was super cool.

Sonic’s official rookie card can be found in the 1993 Topps Sonic the Hedgehog set.  Believe it or not, but sealed boxes of this product sell for $80 today.  Every box comes with (36) wax packs.  The whole set is comprised of (33) cards, (33) stickers, (15) promos, and (6) Prism inserts.  Card #1 pictures Sonic in the Green Hill Zone, which is the first zone in Sonic the Hedgehog.  Cards feature actual pixelated screenshots.  However, Sonic was not left pixelated like he normally would be in the game.  A pixelated Sonic was swapped out for an animated one.  On the back are game tips, and Rogue’s Gallery.

It should be noted that U.K. candy manufacturer Trebor Bassett, a division of Cadbury, issued a 48-card tobacco-size set based on various SEGA titles.  Despite each of these cards having a copyright date of 1991 on the back, they were actually released in 1994.  Three Sonic titles are in here – Sonic the HedgehogSonic the Hedgehog 2, and Sonic the Hedgehog 3.  Given that the first Sonic game came out in 1991, it wouldn’t have been possible for this set to come out that same year because the two sequels didn’t arrive until 1992 and 1994.  Don’t be fooled into thinking Sonic the Hedgehog #35 from this set is his real rookie card.

How To Spot A Counterfeit 1990 Leaf Frank Thomas Rookie Card

As a direct response to the high-quality cards found in 1989 Upper Deck Baseball1990 Leaf Baseball featured some upgraded qualities of it’s own.  Thicker card stock and glossy photos sure had card designs on the upswing.  That time period in the hobby is known as the junk-wax era.  Products were being overproduced to the max.  Today, most of those sets carry little to no value.

“The Big Hurt” a.k.a. Frank Thomas, has a rookie card in the 1990 Leaf Baseball set.  It is card #300.  This likely will be the most valuable card in the set until the end of time.  Guys like Larry Walker and Sammy Sosa have rookies in here too, but their cards don’t have as much demand.

Raw copies of this particular Frank Thomas rookie card continue to sell for anywhere between $2 and $20 depending on the condition.  That’s quite good considering the era its from.  At one point in time the price was much higher.

Counterfeit versions have been floating around the hobby for years.  They continue to popup today.  At a quick glance you could easily purchase one that’s fake.  Upon further inspection, the differences between the two are very clear.

Here is an example of a counterfeit:

The front is fuzzy-looking and has a dot-matrix print pattern.  This can especially be seen on the Chicago White Sox logo, and areas that have a silver color.  Much thinner paper quality too.  That bright gold line above the dugout is also a giveaway.

When looking at the back, the text is much darker.  The trademark logos are lighter in tone along with Frank Thomas’s picture.

Here is an example of an authentic card:

Bryce Harper In A Phillies Uniform – Baseball Authenticated Masterpieces Has That Too!

Here we go Phillies fans!!!  Bryce Harper is officially coming to Philadelphia.  After months of speculation and countless rumors, its finally happening.  The deal is worth $330 million over 13 years.  I think he’s going to be an excellent addition to the Phillies roster.  Not only will the team benefit from him, but the local economy as well.  Its all about merchandising!!!

Bryce Harper is one of the key players on the checklist for Baseball Authenticated Masterpieces.  Knowing that he’d probably be with a new team this year, artist Monty Sheldon held off so at least one of Harper’s baseballs would feature him in his new uniform.  Just like he did with Manny Machado.

Baseball Authenticated Masterpieces is scheduled to be released this spring.  (150) game-used, hand-painted, and autographed baseballs.  (3) different baseballs per player within the main set.

Checkout my latest write-up on this product with an updated sales sheet.