Professional Football Celebrates It’s 125th Anniversary

On Sunday, professional football celebrated it’s 125th anniversary.  According to a November 12, 1892 expense accounting sheet from the Allegheny Athletic Association, a W. Heffelfinger was paid to play.  The official entry on the sheet reads “game performance bonus to W. Heffelfinger for playing (cash) $500.00”.  This is the earliest known evidence of an individual being paid to play football.  Historians consider this document to be professional football’s birth certificate.  $500.00 was a lot of money back then.  He must have been worth it, because the Allegheny Athletic Club beat the Pittsburgh Athletic Club that day 4-0.  Heffelfinger recovered a fumble to score the only touchdown.  In those days a touchdown was only worth four points.

You would think someone as historically significant as William “Pudge” Heffelfinger would have lots of cards.  That is far from the case.  I’d say his 1955 Topps All-American SP #18 is his most important card.  He also has a handful of cards in 2011 TRISTAR Obak, and a cut signature in 2014 Panini National Treasures.

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Card of the Day: Dwight Clark 2015 Topps 60th Anniversary Auto

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Card of the Day: Joe Namath 2015 Topps 60th Anniversary Auto

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Sports Card Info Celebrates It’s 8th Anniversary

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Happy Birthday!

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“Pin-Up” of the Week: Upper Deck Five-Year Anniversary ’89-’93

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Upper Deck has gone through a lot of changes since the time it was celebrating it’s five-year anniversary.  Right now they’re able to make products for the NHL, CFL, Euroleague Basketball, and certain entertainment properties.  Upper Deck will ink certain athletes to deals too.  Then you have products like Goodwin Champions which is like Upper Deck’s version of Allen & Ginter.  You never know what you’ll pull from a box of that stuff.  If I’m not mistaken, the last Upper Deck product that I opened was a box of 2015 Upper Deck Inscriptions Football that came out last spring.  Upper Deck’s NCAA license now resides with Panini.  Too bad, because Upper Deck made a lot of great looking cards for the sports I like.  They may not be producing as many products as they use to, but they certainly haven’t lost their touch.  Connor McDavid Young Guns rookies have been selling for thousands in some cases.  And they’re not even autographed and/or contain a fancy relic.  Just numbered to 100 copies.

Mike Berkus, the co-founder of the National Sports Collectors Convention, passed away last month.  I sent a tweet out to Topps, Upper Deck, Panini, and Leaf stating that they should make cards of Mr. Berkus to give away during the National next year.  Upper Deck responded saying “We are working on several tributes for Mike.”  This could mean a lot of things.  But it wouldn’t surprise me if we see some commemorative Mike Berkus cards being handed out during the 2016 National.  I hope Upper Deck makes one in the 2016 Goodwin Champions design.

This pin was made to celebrate Upper Deck’s fifth anniversary.  How it was distributed is still a mystery to me.  It could’ve been made for employees.  Then again, Upper Deck could have handed them out to it’s customers.  $3.00 is what this pin will run you.

“Pin-Up” of the Week: 1996 National Baseball Hall of Fame Abner Doubleday 100th Anniversary

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Here is another pin from my collection.  Its not one that you see very often.  This was an impulse buy while attending the National Sports Collectors Convention in 2009.  I’d never seen it before, and didn’t know that much about it.  I still don’t know that much about it.  The pin commemorates the 100th anniversary of when the first baseball game was played in 1839.  Its dated 1996 on the back, along with the National Baseball Hall of Fame name.

Abner Doubleday is the supposed inventor of baseball.  Most baseball historians don’t believe this though.  There simply just isn’t enough evidence to prove it.  I don’t think he did.  Doubleday was a cadet at West Point at the time he is said to have invented the game.  His family didn’t live in Cooperstown, New York anymore at that time either.  I think people were looking for the game’s origin, and decided to pin it on Doubleday.  They based it all on a lot of blurry-eyed loose stories.  Despite all this lack of credible evidence, the Baseball Hall of Fame was built in Cooperstown.  Doubleday Field was built on the cow pasture where Abner Doubleday is said to invented the game.  That’s where they play the Hall of Fame Game each year.  As long as the Baseball Hall of Fame is located in Cooperstown, the Doubleday myth will always be a subject fans will talk about.  I don’t see them moving it anytime soon.

Card of the Day: Jimmy Rollins 1998 Bowman Chrome Golden Anniversary Refractors #181

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