Card of the Day: Justin Bour 2016 Topps Archives #82

2018 Topps Archives Signature Series Active Player Edition Box Break & Review

Upon opening a box of Topps Archives Signature Series Active Player Edition last year, my head almost exploded.  Not only did I pull a card numbered one-of-one, but it was an autograph of Mike Trout too.  Its not everyday that you get to pull one of those.  That was the second Mike Trout autograph I’ve pulled.

Topps Archives Signature Series Active Player Edition has returned for 2018.  Housed inside each $50 box is (1) buyback autograph of a current player.  The version of this product that focuses on retired stars will be released in October.

To some collectors, $50 might seem like a lot of money for just one autographed card.  Especially when you have no clue as to who you might get.  That’s why the secondary market is a great place to pickup singles if you don’t feel like taking the $50 gamble.  Over the years, Topps has created some amazing looking sets.  On-card buyback autographs amplify some of those awesome base sets.  I know when opening Gypsy Queen or Allen & Ginter I’ve said to myself “Wouldn’t this base set look cool with autographs?”  Products such as this do exactly that.  Something as simple as an on-card autograph on a base card can be quite eye appealing.  Just look at how well Stadium Club has been received the last few years.  Simple is almost always better when it comes to card design.

The checklist covers (67) active MLB players.  Each player has multiple cards, and the serial numbering varies.  Risk takers hoping for a big pull should have fun.  So should those player collectors picking up cards on the secondary market.  In some way everyone can enjoy it.

Another 1/1!  I’m on a roll with this product.

Here is what I pulled:

Auto

  • Starling Marte 2016 Gypsy Queen Walk-Off Winners Buyback Auto #’ed 1/1

2017 Topps Archives Signature Series Postseason Edition Box Break & Review

I think it’s important to point out that there are two different 2017 Topps Archives Signature Series products this year.  First is the Active Player Edition (Mike Trout on the cover) featuring current stars that continue to play.  The other is the Postseason Edition (Derek Jeter on the cover) that has retired players who performed well during the playoffs and World Series.  Both offer cards which would look great in your collection, but it all depends on what your in the mood to open.

Housed inside each box is (1) encased autographed buyback card.  For the most part, I’ve seen cards from the 80’s, 90’s, and 2000’s.  But I have seen some from the 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s too.  All vary in serial numbering.  Postseason Edition boxes are a lot more affordable when compared to it’s active player counterpart.  $40 will get you one of these.

Buybacks bring life back into older products.  What was once a simple base card now could be super desirable.  When it comes to the Postseason Edition, I like to see autographed buybacks of player’s rookie cards.  In today’s hobby its common to pull rookie autographs of a player.  But this is really only something that started in the 90’s.  There are so many great players collectors never had the opportunity to pull an autographed rookie of.  Buybacks changed that forever.

Stadium ClubNational Chicle, and Allen & Ginter buybacks are my personal favorites.  Base cards from those three products always have me saying “This would look nice with an on-card autograph.”

Over the years, Topps has partnered with many companies in order to bring collectors exclusive cards.  Teaming-up with restaurants, retailers, and food manufacturers was not out of the question.  Using these cards for buybacks was a fun idea.  Cards made for Dairy Queen, McDonald’s, Nestle, Cap’n Crunch, Kmart, Hills, and Toys “R” Us can all be found in here.  Having these semi-obscure sets resurface with autographs I’m betting will bring back lots of memories for collectors.

Here is what I pulled:

Auto

  • Tim Wakefield 2001 Topps Buyback Auto #’ed/10

2017 Topps Archives Signature Series Active Player Edition Box Break & Review

Whoa!  I’m still shaking after ripping into this box.  You would be too if you lifted the lid and saw the card I pulled.

Buybacks are great.  There are lots of well designed cards floating around that don’t carry much value.  Buying them back and adding an autograph can make all the difference.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve opened a product and said to myself “Man, this card would look cool if it had an on-card autograph.”  That’s exactly what buybacks do.

2017 Topps Archives Signature Series Active Player Edition is a picture perfect example of a quick-thrill product.  Boxes range in price from $50 to $70.  Inside each box you’ll find (1) encased autographed buyback card.  Unlike previous releases, this product focuses on current players instead of retired stars.

Yes.  Products like this are a gamble.  But what product today isn’t?  The best thing about products such as this is that the format allows high-rollers to get their fix, while player collectors get to pick-up some very affordable autographs on the secondary market.  To put it simply, the format/price may not be for everyone, but the cards overall appeal to a large audience.

My favorite thing about buybacks are when Topps gets athletes to sign their rookie cards.  Then its a double whammy.  Not only do you get an autograph, but a rookie card too.

Here is what I pulled… brace yourself.

Auto

  • Mike Trout 2013 Bowman Buyback Auto #’ed 1/1

Card of the Day: Pelé 2013 Topps Archives Fan Favorites Auto

Mets ’17 Topps Archives Auto Contest Winner Announced

Congrats to Brett Pasternack on being the lucky winner of the Dave Magadan 2017 Topps Archives Fan Favorites Auto.  Once Brett Pasternack sends me his mailing address, I will ship this card ASAP.  Thanks!

Mets ’17 Topps Archives Auto Contest! – NOW CLOSED

This contest is for a Dave Magadan 2017 Topps Archives Fan Favorites Auto.  Good luck!!!

Contest Details:

  • This contest will end Friday, July 7, 2017 @ 8:00 p.m. EST.
  • To enter, please leave a comment in this post.
  • You can enter once per day.
  • The winner will be selected at random.
  • Please provide a valid e-mail address when entering.
  • The winner will receive an e-mail when the contest is over.
  • The winner has one week to send me their contact information or the contest will be held again.
  • Once the contest is over, I will need the winner’s mailing address so I can ship them this card for FREE!!!

Pirates ’17 Topps Archives Auto Contest Winner Announced

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Congrats to kinkinsley on being the lucky winner of the John Smiley 2017 Topps Archives Fan Favorites Auto.  Once kinkinsley sends me their mailing address, I will ship this card ASAP.  Thanks!

Pirates ’17 Topps Archives Auto Contest! – NOW CLOSED

This contest is for a John Smiley 2017 Topps Archives Fan Favorites Auto.  Good luck!!!

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Contest Details:

  • This contest will end Friday, June 23, 2017 @ 8:00 p.m. EST.
  • To enter, please leave a comment in this post.
  • You can enter once per day.
  • The winner will be selected at random.
  • Please provide a valid e-mail address when entering.
  • The winner will receive an e-mail when the contest is over.
  • The winner has one week to send me their contact information or the contest will be held again.
  • Once the contest is over, I will need the winner’s mailing address so I can ship them this card for FREE!!!

2017 Topps Archives Baseball Box Break & Review

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Retro designs are used throughout many different products today.  Archives has and always will be at the top of that list.  For 2017 Archives, Topps has channeled designs from 1960, 1982, and 1992.  Fun facts about those years include Domino’s Pizza being founded in 1960, the Commodore 64 launching in 1982, and President George H.W. Bush barfed into the lap of Japan’s Prime Minister in 1992.  We won’t find cards commemorating those events in here, but it sure would be fun if we did.

The base set consists of (300) cards.  (100) cards are devoted to the 1960, 1982, and 1992 designs.  Parallels include Peach #’ed/199, Light Blue #’ed/75, Soft Red #’ed/25, and Black #’ed/1.  In addition to those, the 1960, 1982, and 1992 subsets each have something extra to keep an eye out for.  Cards in the 1960 design can have grey backs versus the standard white.  1982 cards can be found without the facsimile signatures – “No Signature”.  The 1992 cards are the easiest to spot because they contain gold foil with the word “Winner” printed on the front.  Photo variations play a big part too.  Luckily Topps made them easy to spot by checking the code on the back.  Base cards end in #2782, whereas photo variations end in #2799.

Derek Jeter has a huge presence within Archives this time around.  They come in the form of reprinted Retrospective cards.  All have their respectful foil parallels and very low numbered autographs.  Three of these cards are short print “hits” – 1993, 2007, and 2015 designs.

The best part of Archives are the autographs.  It is jam packed with on-card autograph goodness.  You’ll find autographs of Hall of Famers and current stars.  Archives is known for having a unique selection of niche players each year.  These players may not be worthy of the Hall of Fame, but they’re retired after having long careers in baseball.  For many, this could very well be the only time they get an autographed card.  One of these years I’d like to see former Phillies pitcher Larry Andersen included in this set.  He’d fit the mold perfectly.

99.9999% of the cards found in 2017 Archives are baseball related.  A few lucky collectors will find autographs of actor Gene Hackman.  These come in the form of buybacks from the original 1978 Topps Superman set.  As cool as these look, you should be careful when buying one on the secondary market.  Buybacks usually come with some type of foil stamp indicating that it was reissued by Topps.  These do not.  That could make it easier for someone to counterfeit.  Topps only got Gene Hackman to sign certain Lex Luther cards from that set.  Depending on the card, Topps only had him use blue or silver pen.  Pulling one directly from the pack is the best way to know if its authentic.  This is probably why his 2017 Topps Series 1 Hoosier autograph is selling for more.

With a cost of around $125 right now for a hobby box, retail blasters might be more up some collector’s alley.  Blasters also contain exclusive coins.

On a side note, I totally agree with Sport Card Collectors.  If guys like Zack Hample and Skip Bayless can get cards, it would be awesome to see some cards made for sports card bloggers.

Here is what I pulled:

Autos

  • Dave Magadan
  • John Smiley

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Parallels

  • Danny Duffy “No Signature” #180
  • Rick Porcello Light Blue #’ed/75
  • Mookie Betts Peach #’ed/199
  • Ian Desmond Peach #’ed/199

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Inserts

  • Yoan Moncada 1959 Bazooka #18
  • Sandy Koufax 1959 Bazooka #17
  • Carlos Correa 1959 Bazooka #1
  • Francisco Lindor 1959 Bazooka #9
  • Derek Jeter Retrospective #2
  • Derek Jeter Retrospective #22
  • Orlando Arcia 2017 Rookie Star #2
  • Yoan Moncada 2017 Rookie Star #1
  • Miguel Cabrera Retro Original #18
  • Jake Arrieta Retro Original #7

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