Big Papi ’19 Topps Series 1 Contest Winner Announced

Congrats to bbcardz on being the lucky winner of the David Ortiz 2019 Topps Series 1 Professional Baseball 150 Years 1869-2019 Commemorative Medallion.  Once bbcardz sends me their mailing address, I will ship this card ASAP.  Thanks!

Advertisements

Wake Forest Demon Deacons ’18 Leaf Valiant Auto Contest! – NOW CLOSED

This contest is for a Cam Serigne 2018 Leaf Valiant Big Targets Orange Parallel Auto #’ed/35.  Good luck!!!

Contest Details:

  • This contest will end Friday, February 8, 2019 @ 8:00 p.m. EST.
  • To enter, please leave a comment in this post.
  • You can enter once per day.
  • The winner will be selected at random.
  • Please provide a valid e-mail address when entering.
  • The winner will receive an e-mail when the contest is over.
  • The winner has one week to send me their contact information or the contest will be held again.
  • Once the contest is over, I will need the winner’s mailing address so I can ship them this card for FREE!!!

Product Highlight: 1990 Good Humor Big League Ice Cream Bar Baseball Bat Autograph Stick

Products come in some elaborate packaging today.  You have to cut, tear, rip, and occasionally use a flamethrower just to access the cards.  It can be ridiculous.  Not to mention drive the price up.

How about having to eat ice cream in order to see what you got?  That’s exactly what needed to be done with the 1990 Good Humor Big League Ice Cream Bar Baseball Bat Autograph Stick set.  The set consists of (26) sticks shaped like miniature baseball bats.  Players are listed in alphabetical order, and numbered accordingly.  Every stick has a facsimile signature on the barrel.

Here’s the checklist:

  • Jim Abbott #1
  • George Bell #2
  • Wade Boggs #3
  • Bobby Bonilla #4
  • Jose Canseco #5
  • Will Clark #6
  • Eric Davis #7
  • Carlton Fisk #8
  • Kirk Gibson #9
  • Dwight Gooden #10
  • Ken Griffey Jr. #11
  • Von Hayes #12
  • Don Mattingly #13
  • Gregg Olson #14
  • Kirby Puckett #15
  • Tim Raines #16
  • Nolan Ryan #17
  • Bret Saberhagen #18
  • Ryne Sandberg #19
  • Benito Santiago #20
  • Mike Scott #21
  • Lonnie Smith #22
  • Ozzie Smith #23
  • Cory Snyder #24
  • Alan Trammell #25
  • Robin Yount #26

I know what you’re thinking.  “Those are cool.  But how would I store them?”  You’re in luck.  Good Humor made a special album that was available through a mail-in offer.  That album is probably more collectible than the actual sticks because you rarely see it.

Not a whole lot of value can be found with these sticks.  They’re all over the place.  None of them sell for more than $5.  Anyone still have a box sitting in the freezer?

2018 Topps Big League Baseball Hobby Box Break & Review

Wanting to get more of a younger demographic back involved with the hobby is something I think all manufacturers would like to do.  This hobby started out for kids.  Then it became a business when all of that old cardboard started to gain value.  Follow that up with much more attention focused on autographs/memorabilia.  Newer products can financially be out of the range for some would be collectors.  Some say digital products like Topps Bunt could possibly be the answer.  Physical products with digital tie-ins maybe.  I don’t know because I’m not a fortune teller.  Its tricky trying to create a product for a younger audience.  Kids don’t like being treated like kids.  They want to pull out the big stuff they see others getting.  But at the same time the manufacturer has to be careful not to load it up too much or the price per box/pack ends up being too high.  Its a balancing act.  For years I’ve said that Topps should have a corporate booth on the Little League campus during the World Series like many companies do.  Talk about hitting your target audience.  Little League has been known to be picky and expensive about who can and cannot setup.  There is a whole system to it.

Enter 2018 Topps Big League Baseball.  Hobby boxes come with (24) packs, (10) cards per pack, and cost about $45.  Its possible to pull a hit, but there is nothing guaranteed per box.  The base set consists of (400) cards.  Parallels include Gold (one per pack), Blue (Blasters), Rainbow Foil #’ed/100, Black & White #’ed/50, and Red Foil #’ed 1/1.

Photo variations are in here too.  The easiest ones to pull are the Base Player Weekend Nickname variations.  These fall 1:3 packs.  I actually consider them more of an insert.  More difficult variations come 1:507 packs.

CMP Codes:

  • Base #106
  • Base Player Weekend Nickname #529
  • Error #530

Like I mentioned before, you aren’t guaranteed any hits per box.  With that being said, autographs can be pulled.  There are two types of autographs.  The first is Big League Autographs which come 1:114 packs.  (34) current stars and veterans make up this checklist.  The other is Rookie Republic Autographs coming in at 1:102 packs.  (23) rookies are in here.  All autographs have Gold #’ed/99, Black & White #’ed/50, and Red Foil #’ed 1/1 parallels.

Star Caricature Reproductions and their original artwork counterparts make for fun pulls.  These add a bit more animation to the player’s face.  I’d have to say that my favorite cards are the Ballpark Landmarks portion of the base set.  You’ll find that they fall between card #351 and #365.  A card of the Harry Kalas statue at Citizens Bank Park would have been neat to see.  The one of B&O Warehouse reminds me of the two times the National Sports Collectors Convention was held in Baltimore.  I can almost see the restaurant I ate at.

If you’re a set collector who wants a break from this year’s flagship design, 2018 Topps Big League Baseball might just work.

Here is what I pulled:

Auto

  • Josh Harrison Big League Autographs

Parallels

  • Jeff Bagwell Rainbow Foil #’ed/100
  • Josh Reddick Gold
  • Aaron Altherr Gold
  • Mike Zunino Gold
  • Ballpark Landmarks Frank Thomas Statue Gold
  • Ballpark Landmarks B&O Warehouse Gold
  • Matt Olson Gold
  • Jorge Polanco Gold
  • Aaron Judge/Edwin Encarnacion/Mike Trout 2017 AL Walk Leaders Stat Kings Gold
  • Michael Fulmer Gold
  • Whit Merrifield Gold
  • Ricky Nolasco Gold
  • Zack Greinke Gold
  • Scott Kingery Gold
  • Erick Fedde Gold
  • Daniel Mengden Gold
  • Carlos Gonzalez Gold
  • Francisco Mejia Gold
  • Jason Kipnis Gold
  • Manny Margot Gold
  • Jed Lowrie Gold
  • Jordan Hicks Gold
  • Ballpark Landmarks Swimming Pool Gold
  • Charlie Blackmon/Giancarlo Stanton/Paul Goldschmidt 2017 NL Runs Scored Leaders Stat Kings Gold
  • Addison Russell Gold

Inserts

  • Miguel Cabrera Star Caricature Reproductions
  • Kris Bryant Star Caricature Reproductions
  • Byron Buxton Star Caricature Reproductions
  • Bryce Harper Ministers Of Mash
  • Mike Trout Ministers Of Mash
  • Aaron Judge Ministers Of Mash
  • Giancarlo Stanton Ministers Of Mash
  • Joey Votto Base Player Weekend Nickname
  • Mookie Betts Base Player Weekend Nickname
  • Manny Machado Base Player Weekend Nickname
  • Alex Bregman Base Player Weekend Nickname
  • Adrian Beltre Base Player Weekend Nickname
  • Anthony Rizzo Base Player Weekend Nickname
  • Aaron Judge Base Player Weekend Nickname
  • Paul Goldschmidt Base Player Weekend Nickname

Flashback Product of the Week: 1991 Pennsylvania High School Big 33

 photo 91big33_zpsmqfzafnf.jpg

Due to a decline in donations and an increasing amount of debt, the Big 33 Scholarship Foundation has decided to close it’s doors after sixty years.  For now, the annual football game it use to sponsor will be under the supervision of the Pennsylvania State Football Coaches Association.

The Big 33 Football Classic began in 1957.  Its often been referred to as the Super Bowl of High School Football.  Over the last six decades the best high school players from Pennsylvania have taken on Ohio, Maryland, and Texas.  In the early years Pennsylvania would just play itself splitting up between east and west or blue and gray.  Between 1957 and 1960 Pennsylvania played against collected talent from around the nation.  Lots of famous football stars have played in the Big 33 game – Herb Adderley, Joe Montana, Dan Marino, and Jim Kelly.  Those are just a few.

Starting in 1991, they began to make team sets.  The Pennsylvania set contains (36) black and white cards.  Key cards include Ray Zellars, Curtis Martin, and Marvin Harrison.  All of these predate their NFL rookies.  It’s 1991 Maryland counterpart doesn’t really have any major cards worth talking about.  Any Big 33 card can make an interesting addition to your collection.  For some collectors, these can be the Holy Grail.  Later on, some sets included autographs.

Its too bad they didn’t make Big 33 cards in the beginning.  As of right now, only three Hall of Famers have Big 33 cards – Marvin Harrison, Curtis Martin, and Orlando Pace.

During my senior year in high school, I received a Big 33 Academic Scholarship.  That included a trip to the 2004 Big 33 game in Hershey, PA.  A couple of players from that game made it to the NFL – Chad Henne, Brian Hoyer, Darrelle Revis, and Ted Ginn Jr.

At one time the Big 33 Football Classic was a large attraction.  According to some past players, the talent just isn’t participating anymore.  Guys don’t want to get hurt and/or they’ve already committed to playing for a college.

Big Papi ’16 Topps Opening Day Jersey Contest Winner Announced

 photo pappi16toppsodjsy1_zpsgf8tctgv.jpg

Congrats to Greg on being the lucky winner of the David Ortiz 2016 Topps Opening Day Jersey.  Once Greg sends me his mailing address, I will ship this card ASAP.  Thanks!

Card of the Day: Terry Bradshaw 1997 Upper Deck Legends Big Game Hunters #B5

 photo terryhunters_zpskxxc5air.jpg