How To Spot A Fake Barry Bonds 1986 Topps Traded Rookie Card

Unless you have his Topps Tiffany counterpart, the basic Barry Bonds 1986 Topps Traded rookie card doesn’t carry much value like it once did.  With that being said, counterfeit copies are still floating around.

Keep these tips in mind.  We don’t want that $5 going towards a counterfeit.

  • The counterfeit is printed on a thicker card stock than the original, and has a weight of 1.70 grams compared to a weight of 1.42 grams of the authentic card.
  • When comparing the edges of both cards, looking straight down on the edge, the counterfeit has a bright white stock compared to the off white, almost yellowed color of the authentic card.  The counterfeit also has a smooth edge compared to the choppier edge of the authentic card.
  • On the front of the counterfeit, the font of the “Topps” logo in the upper right corner is noticeably smaller than the font on the authentic card.
  • The trademark “R”, located just above the word “Topps”, touches the “S” in Topps on the counterfeit, while there is a noticeable space between them on the authentic card.
  • On the front, the font size of the name “Barry Bonds”, at the bottom of the card, is visibly smaller on the counterfeit than the authentic card.
  • The overall fuzziness of the photo on the counterfeit compared to the authentic card is another sign to look for.  A good place to look to help spot the counterfeit is in the blue sky background just to the left of Barry Bonds’ head.  On the real card the sky is made up of blue and white print dots, while on the counterfeit the background has blue, white, red, and black print dots.
  • One sign giving away the counterfeit is the bright white look of the white card stock on the back, which looks almost bleached.  The authentic card has more of an off white color as opposed to the white card stock on the counterfeit’s back.
  • You will notice the card number “11T” has a diamond shaped box around it.  On the authentic card, the corners of this diamond are rounded, while on the counterfeit they come to a point.  The diamond around the “Topps” logo on the back shares this same characteristic.
  • The font size of the card number “11T” is noticeably thinner on the counterfeit than on the authentic card.
  • Look on the back inside the white box which says “Talkin’ Baseball”.  On each of the four corners in this box there is a black line located just inside the corners.  On the authentic card the lines are straight, while on the counterfeit the lines are rounded.

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How To Spot A Fake Ichiro Suzuki 1993 BBM #239 BlueWave Rookie Card

Ichiro!  Ichiro!  Ichiro!  Fans love Ichiro.  They would chant his name hoping to see him get another record breaking hit every time he was at bat.  Before playing for the Seattle Mariners in 2001, Ichiro had a long career of playing baseball in Japan.

One of Ichiro’s most popular Japanese rookie cards can be found in the 1993 BBM set.  The look of this set reminds me of something Pro Set would’ve issued.  Watch out for counterfeits!

These are some items you should watch out for when it comes to counterfeit Ichiro 1993 BBM #239 BlueWave rookie cards.

  • Name placement – counterfeit examples have Ichiro’s name on the front placed off to the right.  Nowhere near as centered as it should be.
  • Compared to an authentic card, the counterfeit will almost always have a fuzzy (spotty) print pattern.
  • On a counterfeit, Ichiro’s name on the front tends to be rounded, fat, and fuzzy (spotty).
  • The “BLUEWAVE 51” lettering on the front is a bit larger and more bold on a counterfeit.
  • Take a look at the ORIX BlueWave logo on the front.  The word “ORIX” is much bolder on a counterfeit.  The red bleeding around the word “BlueWave” is much thicker on a counterfeit too.
  • On the back, the ORIX BlueWave mascot logo has the fuzzy (spotty) print pattern, and usually is lighter in color.

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