Card of the Day: Luke Easter 1953 Bowman Color #104

Card of the Day: Michael Young 2012 Topps Heritage Color Swap Variation SSP #373

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Cardboard Double Take – Reese & Rollins

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Collectors were astonished when their eyes fell upon the 1953 Bowman Color set.  Never before had they seen such beautiful imagery conceived on cardboard.  One of the most impressive looking cards considered by many would be #33.  It features a leaping Pee Wee Reese attempting to make what looks like an impeccable double-play.  Up until this time, collectors didn’t get to see many action shots like this featured on their cards.  Some believe this to be a reverse negative, because it looks as if the runner is going from third back to second.  The runner could have been running in the wrong direction too.  Given that this photograph was taken during a spring training game, you have to imagine that anything could have been going on.

Centering and focus are the two main issues with this specific card.  Some can be blurry.  If you are looking to add one to your collection, poor condition examples can be found for under $100.00.  Ones that are pack fresh and look fantastic can be worth thousands.  If you want a nice one, expect to pay $300.00 to $500.00.

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Since the production of the ’53 Bowman Color Reese, there has been countless action shots included within card sets.  It has become a hobby standard by now.  I’m sure there are shots similar to the Reese, but not as similar as this Jimmy Rollins 2007 Topps Turkey Red #10.  Not only is Rollins throwing in the same direction, but the runner is facing the same way too.  I’m sure the Reese inspired this piece of work.

Card Annoyances: One Color Patch Relics

Every patch card made should be multi-colored.  I think its great when you get lucky enough to pull out a game-used patch relic, but when you look at the patch and its only one color (especially white) the excitement slips away.  A patch card should have at least two colors.  

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Q & A – 1953 Bowman Color Reprints?

Question:  How do I tell the difference between a card from the real ’53 Bowman (color set) and the reprints from the ’80’s?

Answer:  One of the main differences between cards from the original 1953 Bowman Color set and the reprints of the 80’s would be condition.  Cards from 1953 will be harder to find in really good condition.  There are some people that would “artificially” age reprints to make them look like the real thing, so you need to be on the look out for that.  Specifically, the Mickey Mantle 1989 Bowman ’53 Color reprint actually has the word “Reprint” printed on the front.  Another major area that separates the originals from the reprints would be the color of the back.  If you take a look at the back of an original, the color will be a brown or grey.  A lot of the reprints will have a white back.  The original cards measure about 2.5″ x 3.75″.  Reprints may come in different sizes depending on the set.  The best way to be 100% sure is to buy one that is certified and/or graded.

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1989 Bowman Mickey Mantle ’53 Color Reprint

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Original ’53 Bowman Color back

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’53 Bowman Color reprint back