Card of the Day: Mike Schmidt 2001 Upper Deck Hall of Famers – The Endless Summer #3

39th Ephrata Lions Club’s Sports Card Show To Feature Hall Of Fame Infielder Tony Perez

I haven’t attended the Ephrata Lions Club Sports Card Show since 2015.  Not because I couldn’t, but because their autograph guests were people I already had signatures from – Jim Palmer and Brooks Robinson.  Their next show is scheduled for March 24, 2018 and will feature Baseball Hall Of Famer Tony Perez.  I don’t have Perez on any of my bats, so I’ve put the show on my schedule.  If you’re in the area, I highly recommend checking it out.  Dealer tables usually take up a couple of basketball courts.  Lots of Phillies, Eagles, and Steelers items.  For more information, please check out their website.

This show has been around for 39 years.  Not many have been able to continue for that long.  I might even take some Sports Card Info pins to hand out.

Card of the Day: Dan Rooney 2000 Topps Hall of Fame Class of 2000 #4

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Card of the Day: John Madden 2006 Topps Hall of Fame Class of 2006

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“Pin-Up” of the Week: 2016 National Baseball Hall Of Fame Induction Press Pin

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The National Baseball Hall Of Fame welcomed two new members to it’s exclusive club – Mike Piazza and Ken Griffey, Jr.  Who would’ve thought card #1 in the first product released by Upper Deck would end up being the rookie of a future Hall Of Famer.  The odds of that happening are next to nothing.  Making Ken Griffey, Jr. #1 in the 1989 Upper Deck Baseball set was an excellent decision.  Its one of the most iconic cards in the industry.  Rookie cards of Mike Piazza from 1992 Fleer Update and 1992 Bowman have their place too.  Both guys have rookies from a time when everything was being overproduced.

Members of the press were greeted with the above pin for induction weekend.  Just like a lot of press pins, various retail outlets sell a version that looks darn close to the real thing.  They’re fully licensed and not counterfeit, but an unfamiliar collector could easily mistake a retail pin for one made for the press.  There are four major differences between the press and retail pins.  Press pins are serial numbered out of 5,350 on the back, contain gold coloring, have two baseball bats crossing in the background, and the “INDUCTION” banner is straight.  Retail pins have none of that.  The press pins are worth around $100, whereas the retail ones sell for $8.

Goal Line Art: 2016 Pro Football Hall Of Fame Class

Members of the 2016 Pro Football Hall Of Fame Class have received the Goal Line Art treatment.  Artist Gary Thomas has once again worked his magic.  These paintings are extremely well done and look great.

As it has been the case since 1989, a 4″ x 6″ card set has been made based on these original pieces of artwork.  The 2016 set has just been released, and can be purchased here.  Sets usually sell for $30.00.  This year’s HOF inductees include Edward DeBartolo, Tony Dungy, Brett Favre, Kevin Greene, Marvin Harrison, Orlando Pace, Ken Stabler, and Dick Stanfel.

If you’re heading to the Hall Of Fame this summer for the Enshrinement Ceremony, I’d take one of these sets along.  You might be able to get some autographed, and these look cool signed.  Plus, they’re a little easier to carry around versus a football, helmet, or jersey.

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“Pin-Up” of the Week: 1996 National Baseball Hall of Fame Abner Doubleday 100th Anniversary

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Here is another pin from my collection.  Its not one that you see very often.  This was an impulse buy while attending the National Sports Collectors Convention in 2009.  I’d never seen it before, and didn’t know that much about it.  I still don’t know that much about it.  The pin commemorates the 100th anniversary of when the first baseball game was played in 1839.  Its dated 1996 on the back, along with the National Baseball Hall of Fame name.

Abner Doubleday is the supposed inventor of baseball.  Most baseball historians don’t believe this though.  There simply just isn’t enough evidence to prove it.  I don’t think he did.  Doubleday was a cadet at West Point at the time he is said to have invented the game.  His family didn’t live in Cooperstown, New York anymore at that time either.  I think people were looking for the game’s origin, and decided to pin it on Doubleday.  They based it all on a lot of blurry-eyed loose stories.  Despite all this lack of credible evidence, the Baseball Hall of Fame was built in Cooperstown.  Doubleday Field was built on the cow pasture where Abner Doubleday is said to invented the game.  That’s where they play the Hall of Fame Game each year.  As long as the Baseball Hall of Fame is located in Cooperstown, the Doubleday myth will always be a subject fans will talk about.  I don’t see them moving it anytime soon.

“Pin-Up” of the Week: 2015 National Baseball Hall Of Fame Induction Press Pin

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Over the weekend the Baseball Hall of Fame welcomed four new members – Craig Biggio, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez, and John Smoltz.  These are players that have had tons of merchandise made over the years.  An amateur collector would probably think rookie cards of those guys are worth tons.  In truth, its the total opposite.  Their rookies were so overproduced they barely sell for anything unless you have some obscure regionally issued minor league card.

Each year the Baseball Hall of Fame rolls out it’s line of merchandise for the new inductees.  Pins have always been at the core of new stuff.  The pin pictured above is what members of the press received during the 2015 induction ceremony.  I believe other significant individuals received the same pin as well.  On the reverse side you’ll find that it is serial numbered out of 5,000 copies.  They have been selling for $50.00 to $100.00.

The pin pictured below looks almost identical to the version provided to the press and other elite attendees.  But its far from the same thing.  The quality of the real deal is much higher.  If you look closely the real thing has multiple layers to it as well.  This other pin below is only one layer and the quality just isn’t that high.  Plus it isn’t numbered on the back.  I don’t believe this is a fake.  I think they just used the same design for mass production versions to be sold in souvenir shops.

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Goal Line Art Welcomes The 2015 Hall Of Fame Class

Since 1989, Goal Line Art, the Pro Football Hall Of Fame, and artist Gary Thomas have been releasing an annual set depicting some of professional football’s most talented players/coaches/executives.  In 1995, the set began to center around that year’s newest HOF inductees.  Twenty years later, its still being done the same way.

Take a look at these 4″ x 6″ masterpieces featuring the 2015 Hall Of Fame Class.  Tell you what.  If I were attending the HOF induction, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to pick up a set or two to get signed.  These things look crazy good when they’re autographed.

This year’s Hall Of Fame Class includes Jerome Bettis, Tim Brown, Charles Haley, Bill Polian, Junior Seau, Will Shields, Mick Tingelhoff, and Ron Wolf.  Sets generally sell for $30.00.  But older ones can run a lot higher.

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On Location: Inside The Pro Football Hall of Fame – Canton, OH

Over the weekend I took a trip to Canton, Ohio and visited the Pro Football Hall of Fame.  I first visited back in 1998.  That year, guys like Paul Krause and Anthony Munoz got inducted.  It was also the year Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa were neck and neck in the single season home run race.

Going through the Hall of Fame is a blast!!!  They’ve really changed a lot since the last time I was there.  Right after buying your tickets to get in, you’re greeted by a photographer who will take your picture in front of a green screen.  When you’re finished touring the museum, you can stop and see your pictures before leaving.  They put a whole photo package together for you.

The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the holy land for any football fan.  You can sit there and open every high-end football card product on the market today, and it will never come close to the fun stuff you see inside this place.  All the way from professional football’s 1892 birth certificate to memorabilia used by players today.  The Hall of Fame covers everything.

Its difficult to pick what parts of the Hall of Fame are my favorite.  Every corner I turned there was another priceless artifact.  The older memorabilia fascinates me the most.  Mainly because its a miracle that its still around.  The Hall of Fame Gallery filled with all of the inductee busts is really cool too.  That was dramatically better looking than what I remember it being.  But if I had to pick one artifact to be my personal favorite, it would probably be the Vince Lombardi Trophy.

The gift shop is massive and contains every NFL themed item you could possibly think of.  I bought three new pins, lanyard, golf shirt, and a Hall of Fame mini helmet.  I also ate lunch at the Hall of Fame Cafe.  They serve lots of stuff from hot dogs and hamburgers to gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches.

Take a look!!!

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Pro Football’s Birth Certificate – this is an expense sheet from the Allegheny Athletic Association dated November 12, 1892.  The “game performance bonus to W. Heffelfinger for playing (cash) $500.00” is the earliest evidence of someone being paid to play football.

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Jim Thorpe’s Carlisle Indians Letterman Sweater.

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(Top Middle) Arnie Herber’s sideline coat, (Top Left) Butch Gibson’s 1934 N.Y. Giants jersey, (Top Right) “Wooky” Roberts Canton Bulldogs jersey.  Also seen in this picture is the helmet worn by Link Lyman in the 1934 NFL Championship Game, game ball signed by the 1925 N.Y. Giants, and coach’s cap worn by Redskins founder-owner George Preston Marshall.

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Jerseys of Bob Waterfield #7, Bronko Nagurski #3, and Sid Luckman #42.

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Jerseys of Johnny Unitas #19 and Doak Walker #37.

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Jerseys of Jim Brown #32, Lance Alworth’s AFL All-Star jersey #19 , and Sonny Jurgensen #9.  Helmets of Dick Butkus (left), and Tommy Nobis (right).

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Jerseys of Peyton Manning #18, Reggie White #92, and Tony Gonzalez #88.  Shoulder pads of Cortez Kennedy and college helmet of Larry Allen.

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Tim Tebow jersey – this jersey was worn during the playoff win over the Steelers in 2012.  Tebow threw an 80-yard bomb to win the game 29-23.

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Miami Dolphins Perfect Season.

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The “Immaculate Reception” Turf – Franco Harris removed this piece of turf at the exact spot where the “Immaculate Reception” took place in Three Rivers Stadium.

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Toys!!!

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The inaugural Hall of Fame class from 1963.

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Jim Thorpe

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Vince Lombardi

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O.J. Simpson

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Mike Ditka

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Dan Marino

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John Madden

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Team Postcards – (Left) 1911 Nutshell Tigers of Canton, (Right) Game action from a 1900 game.

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World Football League football – they didn’t make it.

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United States Football League football – they didn’t make it either 🙂

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Player bench from the last game Vince Lombardi coached at Lambeau Field.  Green Bay, Dec. 31, 1967.

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LeSean McCoy wore this jersey, gloves, and cleats in a game against the Lions in Dec. 2013.  On that day, in blizzard conditions, McCoy ran for 217 yards setting a new franchise record.

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Vince Lombardi Trophy

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Pittsburgh Steelers Super Bowl XLIII ring.

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“I’m ready to go in coach, just give me a chance.  I know there’s a lot riding on it, but it’s all psychological.  Just gotta stay in a positive frame of mind.” – Ace Ventura