“Pin-Up” of the Week: 2016 National Baseball Hall Of Fame Induction Press Pin

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The National Baseball Hall Of Fame welcomed two new members to it’s exclusive club – Mike Piazza and Ken Griffey, Jr.  Who would’ve thought card #1 in the first product released by Upper Deck would end up being the rookie of a future Hall Of Famer.  The odds of that happening are next to nothing.  Making Ken Griffey, Jr. #1 in the 1989 Upper Deck Baseball set was an excellent decision.  Its one of the most iconic cards in the industry.  Rookie cards of Mike Piazza from 1992 Fleer Update and 1992 Bowman have their place too.  Both guys have rookies from a time when everything was being overproduced.

Members of the press were greeted with the above pin for induction weekend.  Just like a lot of press pins, various retail outlets sell a version that looks darn close to the real thing.  They’re fully licensed and not counterfeit, but an unfamiliar collector could easily mistake a retail pin for one made for the press.  There are four major differences between the press and retail pins.  Press pins are serial numbered out of 5,350 on the back, contain gold coloring, have two baseball bats crossing in the background, and the “INDUCTION” banner is straight.  Retail pins have none of that.  The press pins are worth around $100, whereas the retail ones sell for $8.

“Pin-Up” of the Week: 2015 National Baseball Hall Of Fame Induction Press Pin

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Over the weekend the Baseball Hall of Fame welcomed four new members – Craig Biggio, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez, and John Smoltz.  These are players that have had tons of merchandise made over the years.  An amateur collector would probably think rookie cards of those guys are worth tons.  In truth, its the total opposite.  Their rookies were so overproduced they barely sell for anything unless you have some obscure regionally issued minor league card.

Each year the Baseball Hall of Fame rolls out it’s line of merchandise for the new inductees.  Pins have always been at the core of new stuff.  The pin pictured above is what members of the press received during the 2015 induction ceremony.  I believe other significant individuals received the same pin as well.  On the reverse side you’ll find that it is serial numbered out of 5,000 copies.  They have been selling for $50.00 to $100.00.

The pin pictured below looks almost identical to the version provided to the press and other elite attendees.  But its far from the same thing.  The quality of the real deal is much higher.  If you look closely the real thing has multiple layers to it as well.  This other pin below is only one layer and the quality just isn’t that high.  Plus it isn’t numbered on the back.  I don’t believe this is a fake.  I think they just used the same design for mass production versions to be sold in souvenir shops.

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“Pin-Up” of the Week: Jackie Robinson 1962 Hall of Fame Induction Press Pin

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Cooperstown has spoken.  The 2014 Induction Class includes Tom Glavine, Greg Maddux, and Frank Thomas.  I’m a bit surprised that Craig Biggio didn’t make it in, but I’m sure it won’t be long until he gets there.  At least this year’s class has people that are still alive.  Guys like Sosa, McGwire, Clemens, and Bonds will never make it in.

Jackie Robinson is one of the most influential athletes of all time.  He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1962 along with Bob Feller, Bill McKechnie, and Edd Roush.  The Hall of Fame held a luncheon announcing Robinson’s induction and members of the press were provided with this pin.  I don’t know what it is about these pewter pins, but some of them freak me out.  I think its the eyes.  They always look so empty.  Collectors wanting to add this pin to their collection will have to open their wallets.  One recently sold for $300.00.

Pin of the Day #20

2006 Baseball Hall of Fame Induction pin.