Flashback Product of the Week: 1997 Pinnacle Inside WNBA

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Its the weekend of the Super Bowl and I’m writing about WNBA trading cards.  Something doesn’t seem quite right.

I believe that Pinnacle has the distinguished honor of being the first manufacturer to issue cards for the WNBA.  The product was called 1997 Pinnacle Inside, and if you remember anything from the “Inside” brand its that the cards came sealed inside a soup can.  Pinnacle was obsessed with doing this back in the 90’s.  They put basketball, baseball, football, and hockey cards inside cans.  If I’m not mistaken, Pinnacle even made a can opener that came with each case.  You would walk into your local card shop and think you were at the grocery store.  The can idea is by far one of the most unique ways for cards to be packaged.

The WNBA began league play back in 1997 after receiving some hefty backing from the NBA.  It wasn’t the first time a women’s professional basketball league was put together.  The WBL (Women’s Pro Basketball League) gave it a shot back in 1978, but folded in 1981.  Teams have a strong following, but the WNBA is far from a commercial success.

1997 Pinnacle Inside WNBA is an 82-card set that covers all the main women to play in the inaugural season.  Key rookies to look for include Lisa Leslie, Cynthia Cooper, Sheryl Swoopes, and Tina Thompson.  Sealed cans can be found for a couple dollars.  There really isn’t a whole lot of value when it comes to this set.  WNBA cards made by Fleer and Rittenhouse seem to hold much more value due to having low numbered parallels and autographs/relics.

What Was Inside That Dare To Tear Box Topper?

A couple of weeks ago I held a contest for a sealed Felix Potvin 2010-2011 Zenith Dare To Tear box topper.  Matthew Wilson from the blog Tenets of Wilson was the lucky winner.  I received an e-mail from Matthew early today.  The urge to open it was too much to handle and Matthew decided to tear.  Inside waiting for him wasn’t a base card or a parallel.  Instead what was waiting for him was a Taylor Hall 2010-2011 Donruss Elite RC Auto #’ed/99.  The odds of pulling a card like this are out of this world.  I couldn’t be more happy for Matthew.  I’m glad one of Sports Card Info’s contests could yield such a high-dollar card.  This has to be the most valuable card awarded to a reader.  The last Taylor Hall ’10-’11 Elite RC Auto #’ed/99 sold for $125.00.

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PHOTOS: Inside The Little League World Series Museum

I went through the Little League World Series Museum about 7 years ago and I hadn’t been back until today.  Its not the biggest museum in the world but if your a baseball fan you’ll enjoy it.  Click on each photo for a closer look.

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Jackie Robinson display.  Inside the case they have two Robinson baseball cards – 1954 & 1955 Topps.

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Buck Leonard

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George W. Bush

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Connie Mack – this would be the ultimate addition to my Phillies collection

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Jimmy Carter – Did you know he only attended one MLB game while he was President?

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The Little League Trophy – this was on display at the National Baseball HOF until 1984.  Little League started the year the Baseball HOF opened to the public.

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I need one of these in my room.  The bats rotate when you push the buttons.

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Very early Little League uniform

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Carl Stotz started Little League baseball in 1939.  With all the crazy cards put into circulation today, I’m surprised they never made one of him.  Many pro baseball players have played in the Little League World Series like Cal Ripken, Jr and Dale Murphy.  I could see a cut signature being made of Mr. Stotz.

The Official Pinnacle Can Opener

Pinnacle has finally released a device that helps you get into those packs of 1997 Pinnacle Inside.  Its the official Pinnacle Can Opener 🙂

  

Flashback Product of the Week – Pinnacle Inside

Over the years cards have been packaged in a lot of different ways.  Before Pinnacle died back in 1998, one of their last products they released was the second version of their Pinnacle Inside cards.  What made these cards unique wasn’t just the design of the cards, but the package they came in.  Instead of your standard wax or foil pack, Pinnacle Inside cards came in a clear plastic pack that was then inserted into a sealed soup can.  I don’t know where they came up with the idea that collectors would enjoy opening soup cans to obtained their cards, but this has to be one of the top craziest packaging ideas a card company has ever come up with.  WARNING!!!  DON’T TRY OPENING ANY OF THESE WITH YOUR TEETH!!!