Product Highlight: 1988-90 Topps MLB Sports Shots Duo-Tang Pocket Folders

Whether you’re heading back to school or looking for some fun office supplies I think we can all agree these pocket folders are freakin’ awesome.

I’m going to be dead honest. There really isn’t much to say about them. Pocket folders designed to look like giant Topps baseball cards. You could find them in a variety of stores between 1988 and 1990. We know those are the years they were available because 1988, 1989, and 1990 Topps baseball card designs have been used.

Without an official checklist its unclear if every card in each 1988, 1989, and 1990 set was turned into a pocket folder. You will find folders of stars such as Tony Gwynn and Mark McGwire. But then folders were also made for guys like Greg Walker and Dion James. Folders were not just limited to top name players.

These pocket folders are about as easy to find as their baseball card counterparts. Plenty of them floating around the secondary market.

Folders were issued in 1991, but the design doesn’t follow any known baseball card set.

Pocket-Sized Mailday

Collectibles are collectible today because at one time they weren’t thought to be collectible.  I’ll give you a few seconds for all that to sink in.

I just wanted to show off some gifts I recently received from a very dedicated reader of Sports Card Info.  This reader was going through their inventory and came across some interesting items they thought would fit well into my collection.  Boy were they right!

What they found were six pocket schedules from the Philadelphia Phillies AA minor league team the Reading Phillies.  The schedules range from 1967 to 1974.  Early pocket schedules like this aren’t the easiest things to find.  Upon further research, I found out that 1967 was the first year the Reading Phillies were even around.  Reading has had a baseball team since 1858, but 1967 was the first year they were associated with the Phillies.

Schedules like this were most likely thrown out back then.  They surely weren’t held on to like the schedules are today.  Not only did these schedules survive, but they’re in excellent condition too.  What a cool find!  Thanks!

 photo 67redphillies_zps3d84371a.jpg

 

 photo 67readphilliesmid_zps3f3d45de.jpg

 photo 67readphilliesback_zps2cbb2a84.jpg

 photo 68readphillies_zpsf9197b81.jpg

 photo 70readphillies_zps791c4a3b.jpg

 photo 72readphillies_zpscc6d9c69.jpg

 photo 73readphillies_zps9918619c.jpg

 photo 74readphillies_zps853e0b84.jpg

Baseball Card Pocket Watches

The Hobby is filled with a ton of strange stuff.  Baseball card pocket watches fit very well in this category.  I don’t think I could ever slice up a card, even if its a meaningless base card nobody gives two turds about.  The thought doesn’t even cross my mind when I think of vintage cards.  But apparently not everyone thinks like me (I’m shocked :)) and have cut up a few cards to insert into pocket watches.  I don’t like the idea when manufacturers rip autographed cards up to make cut signatures either.  This is just wrong.

Photobucket

Photobucket