Card of the Day: Joe Kelly 2014 Topps Turkey Red Auto

Card of the Day: Aaron Judge 2017 Topps Transcendent Framed Red Parallel Auto

Card of the Day: Shohei Ohtani 2018 Topps Heritage Real One Red Ink Auto

Card of the Day: Josh Gibson 2005 Topps Turkey Red #306

Cancelled 2020 MLB Little League Classic Pins Begin To Surface – Red Sox vs. Orioles

This COVID-19 virus sure has messed-up a lot of stuff.  Everyone wishes we could just go back to the way things use to be.  Life will eventually get back to normal, but it certainly won’t happen overnight.

One of the casualties of this horrific virus is the Little League World Series.  It has officially been canceled for 2020.  This will be a significant impact to baseball fans, and businesses to the surrounding communities.  Hotels, restaurants, and shops are already hurting.  Taking away the business generated when the world comes to Williamsport will only deepen the economic blow.

With the cancellation of the 2020 Little League World Series also comes the cancellation of the MLB Little League Classic.  Taking place during the Little League World Series, the MLB Little League Classic features two MLB teams playing a regular season game at BB&T Ballpark at Historic Bowman Field right there in Williamsport.  Little League players, and their families are welcomed to attend.  For a lot of these kids, this game might be the only chance they have to watch a MLB game in person.

Collectible lapel pins are a huge part of the Little League World Series.  Everywhere you look teams, districts, players, umpires, ushers, emergency medical staff, security guards, corporate sponsors, and local businesses have pins they’re looking to buy/sell/trade.  2020 will be an unusual year with a low number of pins.  With no Little League World Series being played, it doesn’t make sense to spend money on making them right now.  Especially during this economic downturn.

Some 2020 pins have found their way out.  I suppose they were in the works before the Little League World Series was cancelled.  Take this pin for instance.

It commemorates the now cancelled 2020 MLB Little League Classic between the Red Sox and Orioles.  A handful of these pins have been floating around Williamsport.  I wasn’t fast enough to hit the “Buy It Now” on the first two, but I got lucky with the third.  They were selling extremely fast.  According to the seller, only (50) of these pins were made.  I’ve seen a few different variations.  The pin I bought has a white scoreboard.  Others come in grey.  Its possible there could be more colors.  I’d speculate each color is limited to (50) copies.

The Perfect Valentine’s Day Set – 1954 Red Heart

I don’t believe there could be a more appropriate set to talk about on Valentine’s Day than 1954 Red Heart.

If you were a card collector and had a dog back in the 1950s, Red Heart Dog Food is what your pooch would have eaten.  From a collecting standpoint, there couldn’t be a better example of a regionally issued set.

Coming in at only (33) cards the set is relatively small.  It is split-up between (11) red, (11) green, and (11) blue background cards.  Red backgrounds are said to be the most difficult to find.

Mailing two Red Heart Dog Food labels along with 10 cents to the John Morrell & Company would’ve gotten you (1) 11-card series.  The color you received depended on where you lived.  Certain colors seem to be more/less popular in different regions of the country.  This type of distribution method made it difficult to complete a set.

The checklist is packed with Hall of Famers – Richie Ashburn, Ralph Kiner, Duke Snider, and Enos Slaughter to name a few.  Mickey Mantle and Stan Musial are two of the most popular subjects.  Stan Musial doesn’t appear in either the 1954 Topps or 1954 Bowman sets.  His card from 1954 Red Heart isn’t easy to find (red background), and has a high demand due to his lack of main-issued 1954 cards.  Mickey Mantle is also absent from 1954 Topps, but does appear in 1954 Bowman.

Collectors could take advantage of this mail-in offer all the way through the early 1970s.  That’s a long time for a promotional program to go on.  You can’t say collectors didn’t have enough time to get their hands on them.

Card of the Day: Damien Williams 2014 Topps Turkey Red Mini #52

Card of the Day: Harold “Red” Grange 1988 Swell Football Greats #42

Red Sox ’19 Topps Museum Collection Patch Contest Winner Announced

Congrats to Chris on being the lucky winner of the Dustin Pedroia 2019 Topps Museum Collection Meaningful Material 3-Color Patch Gold Parallel #’ed/25.  Once Chris sends me his mailing address, I will ship this card ASAP.  Thanks!

How To Spot A Fake Roger Clemens 1984 TCMA Pawtucket Red Sox #22 Card

Despite all of the negative press, Roger Clemens is one of those guys collectors still go after.  Its going to be awhile before we see him inducted into Cooperstown though.  One of his most popular cards is the 1984 TCMA Pawtucket Red Sox #22 minor league card.  To many Clemens collectors, this is the big card to own along with the 1984 Fleer Update rookie.  Be careful, because there is a fair share of counterfeits for sale.

Here is an example of a counterfeit version:

Look at the right side of the letter “A” and the left side of the letter “W” in the word “PAWTUCKET”.  The green space in between almost forms a “V” shape.  That is the dead giveaway its a counterfeit.  The space should be a straight green bar with those two sides parallel to one another.

Here is an example of an authentic card:

As you can see, the green bar is perfectly straight and the right side of the letter “A” and the left side of the letter “W” are parallel.