How To Spot A Fake 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk Michael Jordan #7

Fans who attended the 1985 All-Star Weekend Banquet in Indianapolis received a 9-card set of Star basketball cards featuring the Gatorade logo on them. It’s official name is the 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk set. The set includes Checklist #1, Larry Nance #2, Terence Stansbury #3, Clyde Drexler #4, Julius Erving #5, Darrell Griffith #6, Michael Jordan #7, Dominique Wilkins #8, and Orlando Woolridge #9.

Technically there are (10) cards in this set. Terence Stansbury was a late substitute for Charles Barkley. Both cards were produced, but the Barkley card wasn’t released along with the others. Eventually the Barkley card leaked out, and collectors saw it surface on the secondary market.

Star cards are notorious for being counterfeited. That especially goes for Star cards of Michael Jordan. I can’t stress how many counterfeit Michael Jordan Star cards there are floating around. You can easily find them on eBay.

Counterfeit examples of the Michael Jordan 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk card are all over the place. Some people advertise them as authentic, while others do the whole “reprint” or “RP” thing. People use the word “reprint” or the letters “RP” on their listings in an attempt to fool you into thinking that specific card came from a manufacturer like Star. Places like eBay don’t know how or just don’t care enough to learn how to distinguish between the two. The people making these homemade cards are fully aware that passing them off as the real thing could come back to haunt them. Calling them reprints might not bring in the same amount of money, but it still allows them to move their hoard of counterfeits. Its a horribly abused wording loophole.

When placed side-by-side the difference between an authentic example and counterfeit can easily be seen. One of the biggest red flags of a counterfeit is the lack of a line going through the letter “N” in “JORDAN” on the front. I’ve never seen an authentic version without this printing defect. Most counterfeits forget to include this element. Overall photo blurriness, and incorrect coloring can be other signs of a counterfeit.

Flipping the card over you’ll see more red flags. Counterfeit backs tend to have thicker/bold font. In some cases the font is a completely different color especially in Jordan’s bio. Its not uncommon for the text in Jordan’s bio to be broken too on a counterfeit.

If capable, compare the Jordan with another (less expensive) card from the same set. The printing techniques should be similar. Star did not print Michael Jordan’s card any differently.

Counterfeit front

Authentic front

Counterfeit back

Counterfeit back

Authentic back

Card of the Day: Rusty Kilgo 1990 Grand Slam Midwest League All-Star #11

Card of the Day: Bud Collins 2013 Ace Authentic Grand Slam Auto

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“Pin-Up” of the Week: 2015 Little League World Series Grand Slam Parade Committee

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There are about 300+ pins hanging on my wall.  All pinned to lanyards.  A large chunk of the collection are pins from the Little League World Series.  They all vary in rarity.  One of the harder to find pins that I acquired this year was this 11th Annual 2015 Grand Slam Parade Committee pin.  I’ve never seen this specific pin for sale before.

The Grand Slam Parade has kicked off the Little League World Series for the last 11 years.  Its a big celebration that features every team participating in the World Series.  Plus there are marching bands, antique cars, fire trucks, military equipment, the list just goes on and on.  They usually get a baseball player to be the Grand Marshall.  Over the years they’ve gotten many retired/HOFers to take on that role.  For 2015 they had Jim Leyland.

Its not uncommon for people in the parade to be giving out pins.  Throughout the city of Williamsport there are different places you can buy the annual Grand Slam Parade pin.  For the past seven years these pins have been split into two pieces like a puzzle.  I don’t think the committee pins are made available to the public.  You probably need to be on the committee to get one.  This pin slipped through the cracks.

Flashback Product of the Week: 1997 Grand Slam Ventures Champions of Golf Masters Collection

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When Tiger Woods won the 1997 Masters Tournament, collectors were eager to get their hands on his cards.  At the time, they had to settle for only a few.  The first being his S.I. for Kids card that came packaged inside the popular kids magazine the year before.  The second being his 1997 Grand Slam Ventures Champions of Golf Masters Collection Gold Foil and Gold Ink versions.

The 1997 Grand Slam Ventures Champions of Golf Masters Collection is a 62-card set.  It has in it one card for every Masters Champion from 1934 to 1997.  Luckily, Tiger Woods just made the cut.  The most common version you’ll find are the Gold Ink cards.  They issued thousands of these within sealed sets.  The Gold Foil version is much rarer and was only made available to collectors that subscribed to the series.  Both version are very condition sensitive due to the black borders.  Obviously, the Tiger Woods cards are worth the most.  Sealed boxes can be found for $100.00.

Take A Look At These ITG Patches

When you have a bigger relic, you sacrifice a card’s overall design.  But when you have patches this beautiful… forget the design.  Take a gander at these Grand Slam relics found in ITG Heroes & Prospects “Hits” Series 2 Low Numbers.  The release date is 8/3/11.

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ITG’s Grand Slam Memorabilia

Is this not the sickest Mike Schmidt patch you’ve ever seen?  It might be the coolest Phillies patch ever.  This is just a taste of the “Grand Slam” memorabilia cards found in ITG’s Heroes & Prospects which is due out later this month.  I’d love to see one of these cards contain the HK patch the Phillies wore a few years back.

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’09 Grand Slam Parade Pin…… Got One!

This is one of the rarest pins collectors can obtain at this year’s Little League World Series.  The 2009 Grand Slam Parade pin is actually two pins that you put together to make a larger pin.  To obtain both sides you need to purchase a certain amount of groceries at two different locations I’ve been told.  One location will have one side and the other location will have the other side.  This is the rarest Little League pin I have in my collection.  I’d like to say thanks to my friend for dropping it off today 🙂

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The New Grand Slam King

Congrats to Ryan Howard for passing Mike Schmidt as the all-time grand slam king in Philadelphia.  That ball still hasn’t come down.

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Tom “Flash” Gordon

Last night my Phillies lost again to the Marlins.  It was 2-2 during the bottom of the 9th and Cantu was up.  Tom “Flash” Gordon did it again.  He blew it for the Phillies.  He let Cantu hit a game winning grand slam.  Why is it that whenever “Flash” is in he does either really well or really bad.  In my opinion, the Phillies need better pitching.  Cole Hamels and Kyle Kendrick are probably the best pitchers they have and two men can’t do it alone.  Hamels did great last night striking out players into the double digits.  The Phillies have always needed pitching.  I think I have found the only good reason for the overproduction of cards in the mid 80’s to early 90’s.  This card will never go up in value.