2020/21 Upper Deck NHL Star Rookies Box Set Hockey Hobby Box Break

The fifth and final box I decided to break from my Upper Deck Random Acts Of Kindness Package was the 2020/21 Upper Deck NHL Star Rookies Hockey Box Set.

Every box contains the same 25-card set of rookies. Randomly inserted, and quite difficult to pull are autographs. Another big thanks to Upper Deck as all of these boxes were really fun to open.

Here is what I pulled:

25-Card Set:

  • Alexis Lafrenière #1
  • Connor McMichael #2
  • Olli Juolevi #3
  • Nick Robertson #4
  • Liam Foudy #5
  • Timothy Liljegren #6
  • Ty Dellandrea #7
  • Gabe Vilardi #8
  • Josh Norris #9
  • Philipp Kurashev #10
  • Arthur Kaliyev #11
  • Thomas Harley #12
  • Ty Smith #13
  • Dylan Cozens #14
  • K’Andre Miller #15
  • Peyton Krebs #16
  • Victor Soderstrom #17
  • Nils Hoglander #18
  • Ian Mitchell #19
  • Cal Foote #20
  • Bowen Byram #21
  • Alexander Romanov #22
  • Tim Stützle #23
  • Ilya Sorokin #24
  • Kirill Kaprizov #25

How To Spot A Fake 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk Michael Jordan #7

Fans who attended the 1985 All-Star Weekend Banquet in Indianapolis received a 9-card set of Star basketball cards featuring the Gatorade logo on them. It’s official name is the 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk set. The set includes Checklist #1, Larry Nance #2, Terence Stansbury #3, Clyde Drexler #4, Julius Erving #5, Darrell Griffith #6, Michael Jordan #7, Dominique Wilkins #8, and Orlando Woolridge #9.

Technically there are (10) cards in this set. Terence Stansbury was a late substitute for Charles Barkley. Both cards were produced, but the Barkley card wasn’t released along with the others. Eventually the Barkley card leaked out, and collectors saw it surface on the secondary market.

Star cards are notorious for being counterfeited. That especially goes for Star cards of Michael Jordan. I can’t stress how many counterfeit Michael Jordan Star cards there are floating around. You can easily find them on eBay.

Counterfeit examples of the Michael Jordan 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk card are all over the place. Some people advertise them as authentic, while others do the whole “reprint” or “RP” thing. People use the word “reprint” or the letters “RP” on their listings in an attempt to fool you into thinking that specific card came from a manufacturer like Star. Places like eBay don’t know how or just don’t care enough to learn how to distinguish between the two. The people making these homemade cards are fully aware that passing them off as the real thing could come back to haunt them. Calling them reprints might not bring in the same amount of money, but it still allows them to move their hoard of counterfeits. Its a horribly abused wording loophole.

When placed side-by-side the difference between an authentic example and counterfeit can easily be seen. One of the biggest red flags of a counterfeit is the lack of a line going through the letter “N” in “JORDAN” on the front. I’ve never seen an authentic version without this printing defect. Most counterfeits forget to include this element. Overall photo blurriness, and incorrect coloring can be other signs of a counterfeit.

Flipping the card over you’ll see more red flags. Counterfeit backs tend to have thicker/bold font. In some cases the font is a completely different color especially in Jordan’s bio. Its not uncommon for the text in Jordan’s bio to be broken too on a counterfeit.

If capable, compare the Jordan with another (less expensive) card from the same set. The printing techniques should be similar. Star did not print Michael Jordan’s card any differently.

Counterfeit front

Authentic front

Counterfeit back

Counterfeit back

Authentic back

Card of the Day: 1980 Topps Star Wars The Empire Strikes Back Yoda #9

Card of the Day: Orlando Pace 1997 Upper Deck Star Rookie #1

Card of the Day: 2020 Topps Star Wars Stellar Signatures Pedro Pascal The Mandalorian Green Parallel Auto

Card of the Day: Doc Rivers 1984-85 Star #84

Product Highlight: 1991 Star Pics Football

For the short time that Star Pics was around they made quite an impact.  Star Pics, Inc. produced card sets for football, basketball, hockey, and various entertainment properties from 1990 to about 1992.  During this time in the hobby overproduction was in full swing, and cards limited into the thousands were considered rare.  Many of the key Star Pics signed cards continue to sell well today.  This is something that many flash in the pan card manufacturers would have killed for.

One of the most memorable Star Pics release has to be their football set from 1991.  Their 1991 football set consists of (112) cards.  Boxes and card borders are covered in footballs.  There are so many footballs in one area it reminds me of those magic eye pictures.  If you stare long enough at the footballs, you’ll probably start to see some hidden image.  The card that gets the most attention from the base set is Brett Favre #65.

Star Pics issued their 1991 football product in factory sets.  Randomly inserted within their factory sets were autographed cards.  The autographs look just like the base, except they have a signature on the front or back, and contain a gold authenticity sticker.  Stars such as Barry Sanders, Emmitt Smith, Brett Favre, and Troy Aikman all have autographs.  It should be noted that the Star Pics autographs have been victims of counterfeits.  Since the autographs look exactly like the base cards, it wouldn’t be that difficult to take a base card of Brett Favre, forge his signature, and place an authenticity sticker on it which has been removed from a legit autograph of a less valuable player.

Card of the Day: Lucas Giolito 2016 Topps Five Star Auto

Card of the Day: 1977 Topps Star Wars – A Pair Of Jawas #257

Card of the Day: Billy Wagner 1996 Topps Future Star #212