Hobby Oddities: An Introduction To Baseball Card Collecting On VHS

The year is 1989. You’re visiting your local video rental store. Walking up and down the aisles you begin to browse their inventory. Die Hard, Beetlejuice, Coming To America, etc… Its a difficult choice. That’s until you see An Introduction To Baseball Card Collecting. I’ll take it!

An Introduction To Baseball Card Collecting was released in 1989. In this 28 minute video Bobby Valentine covers many of the important principles as to how baseball cards were collected at that time. Some of these principles are valid today, while others are completely outdated.

An example of an outdated principle is when the video states that a player’s rookie card is his most valuable card. At one time this was true. Today we have grading, parallels, autographs, and relics. A mass-produced base rookie card can be worth significantly less when compared to a non-rookie, low-numbered, autograph, relic card of the same player today.

Distributed by JCI Video out of Woodland Hills, CA. The summary on the VHS back reads:

Finally, a video about baseball card collecting is available! Bobby Valentine hosts this beautifully filmed explanation of how a simple pastime of the 1950s exploded into a multi-million dollar industry in the 1980s. Bobby discusses all the basic subjects of card collecting, including how the distribution methods through 1973 affect card prices today and the current hobby role played by dealers, card shops, trade shows, price guides and hobby newspapers.

A highlight of the video is its photography of the cards themselves, filmed with lush backgrounds and lighting effects to make their rich colors evoke the kind of nostalgic emotions that are the essence of the relationship between a collector and his cards.

I wonder if we’ll ever see the 4K, Blue-Ray, DVD, Extended Director’s Cut? Imagine watching it in IMAX.

Believe it or not this wasn’t the only VHS released on baseball card collecting. There are others.

Grading started with cards, and now extends all the way to VHS tapes. Someone should get a copy of An Introduction To Baseball Card Collecting graded. That would complete the circle.

2022 Topps Mini Baseball Now Available To 582 Montgomery Club Members

2022 Topps Mini Baseball went up for sale today on the Topps website for 582 Montgomery Club members.

$24.99 per box with a (2) box limit.

(990) cards make up the entire set (Series 1, Series 2, and Update Series). Each box should contain (35) cards with (2) inserts, and (3) parallels. Variations and autographs are also something to watch for.

2021/22 Topps Bundesliga Chrome Sapphire Edition Available To 582 Montgomery Club Members Tomorrow

Members of the Topps 582 Montgomery Club will have the option to buy 2021/22 Topps Bundesliga Chrome Sapphire Edition tomorrow 9/1.

2022 Topps Finest Flashbacks Now Available To 582 Montgomery Club Members

Members of the Topps 582 Montgomery Club are now able to buy (1) box of 2022 Topps Finest Flashbacks.

2021-22 Topps Chrome UEFA Champion’s League Sapphire Edition Available To Montgomery Club Members

Members of the Topps 582 Montgomery Club are able to purchase their allocation of 2021-22 Topps Chrome UEFA Champion’s League Sapphire Edition.

2022 Bowman Sapphire Edition Baseball Available To Topps 582 Montgomery Club Members Today

Members of the Topps 582 Montgomery Club are allowed to purchase (1) box of 2022 Bowman Sapphire Edition Baseball today 5/24/22 while supplies last.

2021 Bowman Chrome Sapphire Edition Baseball Coming 5/12/22 To Montgomery Club Members

The next pre-sale for Topps 582 Montgomery Club members is 2021 Bowman Chrome Sapphire Edition Baseball.

Montgomery Club Members Are NOT Entitled To Every Topps Online-Exclusive Product First

Members of the Topps 582 Montgomery Club were shocked on Friday, May 6, 2022 when they discovered that 2021 Topps Formula 1 Chrome Sapphire Edition was on sale to the general public. Usually club members get first access to popular online-exclusive products before everyone else for the most part.

Boxes began popping up on Topps’ European sites, and then made their was to the U.S. I was able to add (1) box to my cart, but the Topps website froze for me during the checkout process due to the high volume of users. Some made it through successfully, bots especially, before it sold out.

A box of 2020 Topps Formula 1 Chrome Sapphire Edition originally cost $99. As of right now that same product sells for around $4k. Even with the increased price ($699.99) for the 2021 product you can see why club members are angry they weren’t offered it first like they were last year.

Although a massive surprise, if you read the language on the Topps 582 Montgomery Club website it clearly states “Exclusive Access to Pre-Sale window for select Topps 2022 Online Exclusives including Sapphire, Finest Flashbacks, Ginter X, and Archives Snapshots.” The keyword here is “select”. “Select” does not mean members will get a pre-sale window for every online-exclusive product. It means just the ones Topps chooses. Which products Topps chooses can clearly change from year to year.

Attempt to charge back your membership fee, threaten not to renew your membership next year, and write all of the hate e-mail you want. All the threats in the world aren’t going to make you feel better. 2021 Topps Formula 1 Chrome Sapphire Edition is most likely gone for the $699.99 price, and nothing is going to change that. If you want a box you’ll have to pay more on the secondary market. I would be very surprised if Topps offers members their allocation now that the general public sale is over.

Why wasn’t 2021 Topps Formula 1 Chrome Sapphire Edition one of the “select” products for pre-sale? Rumors and people’s imaginations instantly began to run wild. Maybe some of it will turn out to be true. You can read through it all on the Blowout Forums.

We still have a lot of the year to go. Topps could very easily surprise members with an exclusive product (never produced before) that could make up for 2021 Topps Formula 1 Chrome Sapphire Edition not being offered to club members first. Then again, they don’t have to.

In the end, it is all in the details of the language for the club we signed up for. Plain and simple.

How To Spot A Fake Ludwell Denny 1990 Pro Set #338 Promo

The odds of you finding this card out in the wild are about as good as the Phillies calling me up asking if I’d like to play first base. Its not likely to happen.

As I mentioned in my 2021 Leaf Pro Set College Football Blaster Box Break, Ludwell Denny founded Pro Set in 1988. Between 1988 and 1994 Pro Set issued card products for the NFL, NBA, NHL, NASCAR, and PGA Tour. Their parody “Flopps” promo set was about as close as they got to making MLB cards. Outside of sports they made a variety of entertainment products as well. Pro Set went bankrupt after 1994. In February 2021 it was announced that Leaf Trading Cards had acquired the Pro Set trademark, and quickly began using it on their products.

Mr. Denny had a card of himself printed in 1990. Don’t bother ripping through old packs hoping to find it. They were used as promotional handouts. Almost like a business card. Although an official print run was never released, supposedly one sheet amounting to (90) cards was made. How many were actually handed out is a number we will never know.

Pro Set was notorious for their errors, misprints, corrections, short prints, variations, etc… Sometimes I think they did this on purpose just to keep collectors on their toes.

The Ludwell Denny promo card is one die-hard Pro Set collectors would love to add to their collection. I’ve only seen one show up for sale, and it has been on eBay for years with an incredibly high asking price.

No authentic alternate versions of this card are known to exist. No errors, misprints, corrections, short prints, and/or variations. What you see is what you get. However, there are counterfeits floating around.

The differences drastically stick out when an authentic card is placed side-by-side with a counterfeit one.

Characteristics of a counterfeit card include dark coloring on both the front and back.

The font is completely different where it says “Ludwell Denny Head Coach Giants” on the front. Turning the card over you can see the font used for “Ludwell Denny Head Coach” is also quite different. The font used for the card number isn’t correct either.

Counterfeits use a dot instead of a dash to separate the words “Coach” and “Giants” on the front.

Numerous misspellings and grammatical errors totally pollute the description on the back of the counterfeit.

On the back of a counterfeit the words “National Football League Players Association” surround the football image near the bottom. Authentic examples do not have this wording.

Authentic front
Authentic back
Counterfeit front
Counterfeit back

How To Spot A Fake 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk Michael Jordan #7

Fans who attended the 1985 All-Star Weekend Banquet in Indianapolis received a 9-card set of Star basketball cards featuring the Gatorade logo on them. It’s official name is the 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk set. The set includes Checklist #1, Larry Nance #2, Terence Stansbury #3, Clyde Drexler #4, Julius Erving #5, Darrell Griffith #6, Michael Jordan #7, Dominique Wilkins #8, and Orlando Woolridge #9.

Technically there are (10) cards in this set. Terence Stansbury was a late substitute for Charles Barkley. Both cards were produced, but the Barkley card wasn’t released along with the others. Eventually the Barkley card leaked out, and collectors saw it surface on the secondary market.

Star cards are notorious for being counterfeited. That especially goes for Star cards of Michael Jordan. I can’t stress how many counterfeit Michael Jordan Star cards there are floating around. You can easily find them on eBay.

Counterfeit examples of the Michael Jordan 1985 Star Gatorade Slam Dunk card are all over the place. Some people advertise them as authentic, while others do the whole “reprint” or “RP” thing. People use the word “reprint” or the letters “RP” on their listings in an attempt to fool you into thinking that specific card came from a manufacturer like Star. Places like eBay don’t know how or just don’t care enough to learn how to distinguish between the two. The people making these homemade cards are fully aware that passing them off as the real thing could come back to haunt them. Calling them reprints might not bring in the same amount of money, but it still allows them to move their hoard of counterfeits. Its a horribly abused wording loophole.

When placed side-by-side the difference between an authentic example and counterfeit can easily be seen. One of the biggest red flags of a counterfeit is the lack of a line going through the letter “N” in “JORDAN” on the front. I’ve never seen an authentic version without this printing defect. Most counterfeits forget to include this element. Overall photo blurriness, and incorrect coloring can be other signs of a counterfeit.

Flipping the card over you’ll see more red flags. Counterfeit backs tend to have thicker/bold font. In some cases the font is a completely different color especially in Jordan’s bio. Its not uncommon for the text in Jordan’s bio to be broken too on a counterfeit.

If capable, compare the Jordan with another (less expensive) card from the same set. The printing techniques should be similar. Star did not print Michael Jordan’s card any differently.

Counterfeit front

Authentic front

Counterfeit back

Counterfeit back

Authentic back