Orioles ’18 Baseball Treasure Copper Coin Contest Winner Announced

Congrats to y2jbrak on being the lucky winner of the Adam Jones 2018 Baseball Treasure 1-ounce copper coin card.  Once y2jbrak sends me their mailing address, I will ship this card ASAP.  Thanks!

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Orioles ’18 Baseball Treasure Copper Coin Contest! – NOW CLOSED

This contest is for a Adam Jones 2018 Baseball Treasure 1-ounce copper coin card.  Good luck!!!

Contest Details:

  • This contest will end Friday, June 15, 2018 @ 8:00 p.m. EST.
  • To enter, please leave a comment in this post.
  • You can enter once per day.
  • The winner will be selected at random.
  • Please provide a valid e-mail address when entering.
  • The winner will receive an e-mail when the contest is over.
  • The winner has one week to send me their contact information or the contest will be held again.
  • Once the contest is over, I will need the winner’s mailing address so I can ship them this card for FREE!!!

2018 Baseball Treasure MLB Coins 3-Pack Break & Review

Wow!  These bring back some memories.  During my early collecting years I remember buying packs of Pinnacle Mint baseball and football cards at my local shop called The Penalty Shot.  Everyone remembers those cards that came with coins.  I had a ton of them.  John Connor and Rick Canale of Baseball Treasure have decided to bring this idea back in what I think is a bigger and better way.

Housed inside each $6.99 pack is (1) baseball coin.  There is (1) player coin made for each MLB team.  Officially licensed by both MLB and the MLBPA.  On the “heads” side you’ll see the portrait, name, and position.  The “tails” side has a career highlight and action shot.

Baseball Treasure minted most of the coins in one-ounce of copper.  Falling about 1:432 packs are rare one-ounce silver coins.  Even rarer, 1:21,600 packs, are special coins redeemable for a one-ounce gold coin of Aaron Judge.  Just to be clear, Aaron Judge is the only player to have a gold coin.  Everyone else only has copper and silver.  It would be neat to see someone complete the Aaron Judge rainbow and own all three coins.  Here is what the redemption card looks like for the Aaron Judge one-ounce gold coin.  By the looks of it a copper coin comes attached to the redemption.  That’s a good idea otherwise the pack with the redemption card in it would feel much lighter making it easier to pick out.

I like the fact the focus is mainly on the coins.  Its also nice that the coins already come inserted within the card.  Having the collector do that can really damage the card.  I did that plenty of times with Pinnacle MintAn album to help store the coins is coming out soon.

For those wondering who all is included in this first series, here is a checklist:

  • José Altuve, Houston Astros
  • Nolan Arenado, Colorado Rockies
  • Josh Bell, Pittsburgh Pirates
  • Adrián Beltré, Texas Rangers
  • Mookie Betts, Boston Red Sox
  • Justin Bour, Miami Marlins
  • Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Tigers
  • Robinson Canó, Seattle Mariners
  • Michael Conforto, New York Mets
  • Khris Davis, Oakland Athletics
  • Corey Dickerson, Tampa Bay Rays
  • Freddie Freeman, Atlanta Braves
  • Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks
  • Bryce Harper, Washington Nationals
  • Rhys Hoskins, Philadelphia Phillies
  • Adam Jones, Baltimore Orioles
  • Aaron Judge, New York Yankees
  • Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers
  • Francisco Lindor, Cleveland Indians
  • Joe Mauer, Minnesota Twins
  • Yadier Molina, St. Louis Cardinals
  • Yoan Moncada, Chicago White Sox
  • Wil Myers, San Diego Padres
  • Salvador Pérez, Kansas City Royals
  • Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants
  • Anthony Rizzo, Chicago Cubs
  • Travis Shaw, Milwaukee Brewers
  • Marcus Stroman, Toronto Blue Jays
  • Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels
  • Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds

Here is the result of my 3-pack break:

Treasure Detectives Tackle The Cobb-Edwards T206 Wagner

Thanks to shows like Pawn Stars, sports memorabilia has been getting its share of prime time coverage.  I usually make it a point to watch if I hear that a sports related item is going to be featured in one of their segments.  One of the newest shows that deals with collectibles began this month on CNBC Prime called Treasure Detectives.  In this show, experts take a look at specific items brought to them by individuals and they determine whether or not the item is real or fake based on a handul of forensic tests.  The hour long program usually swaps back and forth during the investigation process between the two items that are in question.  Its a refreshing show that doesn’t focus mainly on the item’s value, although dollar amounts do pop-up when they talk about what the item could potential be worth if it is determined to be authentic.

In the second episode, part of the show covers the Cobb-Edwards 1909-11 T206 Honus Wagner tobacco card.  Out of the 50 or 60 examples that exist today, this one has been in question for years.  According to Edwards, it was purchased from someone who obtained it at an estate sale in 1980.  Before that, there isn’t too much history on how the card surfaced or who owned it.  It was originally purchased supposedly for $1,800.00.  Over the years the card has gone through a handful of tests each coming up with vague yes-no determinations.  Eventually it landed itself in an ACA Grading holder which deemed the card to be authentic.  Why would they use ACA Grading to authenticate their card?  Most likely because they were the only company willing to touch the card and say it was real.  ACA probably wanted some attention from the hobby too.

For a majority of the show, Mr. Edwards wouldn’t let the examiners remove the card from it’s holder.  It wasn’t until the end where they brought in the individual from ACA Grading who encased the card and asked him to remove it so they could take a closer look under a microscope.  While taking a look at it with the microscope, you could clearly see the print pattern on the Cobb-Edwards card was not consistent with other T206 cards from the same set.  The font and spacing was off too.  One of the best ways to determine if a T206 card is counterfeit is to compare it to another common card from the set.  These cards were originally made as promos, and were expected to be thrown out.  They didn’t go out of their way to make some cards better looking than others.  Scanning the card in the CT scanner revealed that there was a potential bulge near the middle indicating that there might be more than one piece of paper present.  Given that the card was still in its holder at the time of the scan, they indicated that their measurements could be off.  I personally don’t buy that for a second.  CT scanners are designed to see through skin, muscle, tissue, and bone.  Not to mention tumors deep within the brain.  A little plastic holder shouldn’t be a problem.  Then again, I’m no doctor.

It was interesting to watch the show’s experts go about making a fake.  The end result was a spot on match to the Cobb-Edwards card.  The paper used on the Cobb-Edwards card is old which leads me to believe that its probably just an early fake.  Given all this information, it was no surprise that in the end they came to the conclusion the card isn’t the real thing.  Most collectors that were already aware of this card have had that in their heads for years.

As for the Canadian based ACA Grading.  What little reputation they had in the industry has been blown out to sea.

Treasure Detectives can be seen on CNBC Prime Tuesday nights @ 9:00 EST.  They also run re-runs all the time.

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